Mathematicians of EvenQuads Deck 1

Deck 1 of EvenQuads features the below amazing 64 mathematicians. Flip a card to get information about the artist, a link to a short biography, a downloadable 8.5” x 11” poster, and for some, links to video interviews. All the images are courtesy of volunteer artists and the short biographies are the work of volunteer biography writers using public records. A full list of the volunteers can be found here. Featured mathematicians are welcome to add new information, correct inaccuracies, provide updates about their activities and status, and share other aspects of their lives. To do so, please email playingcards@awm-math.org. Download all 64 individual posters as a .zip archive here.

The content of the EvenQuads website is available for use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Each individual portrait is the property of the artist and should not be used without the EvenQuads context. The EvenQuads decks and other material available from the AWM e-store may not be reused without permission.

Maria Agnesi

Maria Gaetana Agnesi

1718–1799

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Nkechi Madonna Adeleine Agwu

Nkechi Madonna Adeleine Agwu

b. 1962

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Portrait by Yirong Yang

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Beatrice Aitchison

 Beatrice Aitchison

1908–1997

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Portrait by Guillermo Carlo Nunez

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Jacqueline (Jackie) Akinpelu
Grace Alele-Williams

Grace Alele-Williams

b. 1932

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Carolina Araujo

Carolina Araujo

b. 1976

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Portrait by Michael S. Greenberg

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Joan Birman

Joan Birman

b. 1927

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Portrait by Hannah Cruz

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Lenore Blum

Lenore Blum

b. 1942

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Portrait by Nikki Cheng

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Jo Boaler

Jo Boaler

b. 1964

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Portrait by Susan Kelly

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Sylvia T. Bozeman
Susanne Brenner

Susanne Brenner

b. 1958

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Portrait by Alina August DeMeyer

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Sylvia Celedón-Pattichis

Sylvia Celedón-Pattichis

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Portrait by Elise Brady

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Moira Chas

Moira Chas

b. 1965

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Portrait by Measa Kuhlers

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Eugenia Cheng

Eugenia Cheng

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Portrait by Chloe Avery

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Fan Chung

Fan Chung

b. 1949

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Portrait by Susan Kelly

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Marta Civil

Marta Civil

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Portrait by Kevin Byrnes

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Alissa S. Crans

Alissa S. Crans

b. 1977

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Marianna Csörnyei

Marianna Csörnyei

b. 1975

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Portrait by Jenn Duan

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Ingrid Daubechies

 Ingrid Daubechies

b. 1954

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Portrait by Susan Kelly

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Etta Zuber Falconer

Etta Zuber Falconer

1933–2002

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Portrait by Susan Kelly

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Lisa Fauci

Lisa Fauci

b. 1960

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Portrait by Oliver Sen

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Joan Feigenbaum

Joan Feigenbaum

b. 1958

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Portrait by Kay Hughes

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Sophie Germain

Sophie Germain

1776–1831

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Portrait by Bronna A. Butler

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Concha Gómez

Concha Gómez

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Portrait by Dana Isabella Dalmacio

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Rochelle Gutiérrez

Rochelle Gutiérrez

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Portrait by Clare Jin

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Rosemary Guzman

Rosemary Guzman

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Portrait by Measa Kuhlers

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Margaret Hamilton

Margaret Heafield Hamilton

b. 1936

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Portrait by Angelina Schenck

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Pamela E. Harris
Deanna Haunsperger

Deanna Haunsperger

b. 1964

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Portrait by Ally Lee

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Euphemia Lofton Haynes

Euphemia Lofton Haynes

1890–1980

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Portrait by Clarisse Bonnand

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Gloria Conyers Hewitt

Gloria Conyers Hewitt

b. 1935

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Portrait by Mila Matney

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Dorothy Hoover

Dorothy McFadden Hoover

1918–2000

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Portrait by Emma Lennen

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Trachette L. Jackson
Lisa Jeffrey

Lisa Jeffrey

b. 1965

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Portrait by Susan Kelly

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Anita T. Layton

Anita T. Layton

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Portrait by Susan Kelly

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Rachel Levy

Rachel Levy

b. 1968

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Portrait by Patrizia Choran

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Ling Long

Ling Long

b. 1974

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Portrait by Clarisse Bonnand

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Dawn Alisha Lott

Dawn Alisha Lott

b. 1965

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Portrait by Alexandra Squires

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Guadalupe Inés Lozano

Guadalupe Inés Lozano

b. 1971

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Portrait by Jessica Zhang

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Verdiana Grace Masanja

Verdiana Grace Masanja

b. 1954

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Portrait by Thaicia Stona

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Vilma Mesa

Vilma Mesa

b. 1963

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Portrait by Mary Busker

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Rosa Maria Miró-Roig

Rosa Maria Miró-Roig

b. 1960

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Portrait by Thaicia Stona

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Maryam Mirzakhani

Maryam Mirzakhani

1977–2017

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale

1820–1910

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Portrait by Juniper Glass-Klaiber

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Emmy Noether

Emmy Noether

1882–1935

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Helena Nussenzveig

Helena Judish Nussenzveig Lopes

b. 1963

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Portrait by Seyantina Mondal

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Dianne P. O’Leary

Dianne P. O’Leary

b. 1951

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Portrait by Susan Kelly

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Nora G. Ramirez

Nora G. Ramirez

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Portrait by Linn Plant

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Julia Bowman Robinson

Julia Bowman Robinson

1919–1985

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Mary G. Ross

Mary G. Ross

1908–2008

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Mary Ellen Rudin

Mary Ellen Rudin

1924–2013

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Portrait by Caledonia Wilson

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Alice T. Schafer

Alice T. Schafer

1915–2009

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Charlotte Angas Scott

Charlotte Angas Scott 

1858–1931

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Portrait by Madeleine Oswood

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Rodica Simion

Rodica Simion

1955–2000

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Portrait by Katie Slyman

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Bhama Srinivasan

Bhama Srinivasan

b. 1935

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Tatiana Toro

Tatiana Toro

b. 1964

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Portrait by Madison Stuart

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Olga Tsuberbiller

 Olga Tsuberbiller

1885–1975

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Portrait by Jennie Kleven

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Talitha M. Washington

Talitha M. Washington

b. 1974

Click here for a brief video by NSF!

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Portrait by Liz Fedak

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Sijue Wu

Sijue Wu

b. 1964

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Portrait by Tiffany Ding

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Lai-Sang Young

Lai-Sang Young

b. 1952

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Portrait by Maya Urbschat

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Maria Gaetana Agnesi (1718–1799)

Maria Gaetana Agnesi is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and mathematics education.

Maria Gaetana Agnesi was born in Milan in 1718. Her intellectual pursuits started at a young age when she began to attend philosophy and mathematics seminars in her own home. Based on her experiences attending these academic lectures, Agnesi wrote a collection of essays in 1738 called Propositiones Philosophicae containing nearly 200 propositions, and in which she encouraged women to be educated.

Agnesi’s pedagogical work came from necessity. In order to provide a reference for some of her 20 siblings, at the age of 30 she wrote Instituzioni Analitiche ad uso della gioventù italiana (Analytical Institutions), which explained differential and integral calculus. This was one of the first texts to comprehensively treat mathematical analysis, of both the finite and infinitesimal. In her work she brought the ideas of many mathematicians together in a clear and concise way that would be used for generations to come. Because of this text, Agnesi was elected to the Bologna Academy of Sciences.

Her most famous contribution to mathematics is the Witch of Agnesi, a sine curve whose equation she wrote based on Fermat and Grandi’s study. In 1750, Pope Benedict XIV appointed her to be a reader at the University of Bologna (the first woman to be given the position) and later chair of mathematics, but historical records are not clear as to whether she served in either role. She turned from mathematics to religious service and charity work (especially caring for the poor and infirm) around age 34, and lived to age 80.

References

The 18th-Century Lady Mathematician Who Loved Calculus and God. Smithsonian Magazine, May 16, 2018.

http://www.math.wichita.edu/history/Women/agnesi.html

https://www.agnesscott.edu/lriddle/women/agnesi.htm

Nkechi Madonna Adeleine Agwu (b. 1962)

Nkechi Madonna Adeleine Agwu is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and mathematics in business, industry, and government.

Nkechi Agwu was born in Nigeria in 1962, but because of the civil war that raged during her childhood, spent several years as a refugee in Sierra Leone. She earned her BSc from the University of Nigeria in 1984, where the mathematics department gave her the “Best Graduating Student” award. Agwu worked as a government statistician and taught at a vocational/technical college before moving to the US. Her arrival in the US was made possible by an MAA travel award. 

Agwu earned her masters in mathematics from the University of Connecticut in 1989 and earned a PhD in mathematics education from Syracuse University in 1995. Her dissertation examined the use of calculators versus computers in teaching calculus. Agwu has taught for over 20 years at the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC), City University of New York (CUNY). 

Agwu’s interests include gender studies, ethnomathematics, and the history of mathematics, especially the math of Ndebele dolls, African textiles, and the use of women’s storytelling in STEM education. She has published two papers on Black mathematicians. In July 2009, Agwu was elected President of the New York City section of the American Association of University WomenAgwu was awarded a Carnegie Africa Diaspora Fellowship in 2014.

Personal Statement

“I, Reverend Nkechi (God’s Own) Madonna Adeleine (NMA) Agwu, Ph.D., an ethno-mathematician and farmer by family tradition, complements my Even Quads biography using the innovative practice of mathematical storytelling, a procedure developed by me. This procedure uses the tools of mathematics; indigenous mathematical and philosophical knowledge systems; cultural heritage items such as games, artforms, architecture, textiles and so on to tell stories about individuals, ethnic groups and communities in a manner that will foster creativity, innovation, entrepreneurship, facilitate interest in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM), and promote equity, justice and inclusion.” Click here for the full statement.

References

https://www.bmcc.cuny.edu/news/professor-nkechi-agwu-one-of-64-notable-mathematicians-featured-by-association-for-women-in-mathematics/

Nkechi Agwu (1962- ) – Biography MacTutor History of Mathematics. Written by J J O’Connor and E F Robertson. March 2019.

Nkechi Agwu – BMCC

Beatrice Aitchison (1908–1997)

Beatrice Aitchison is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Beatrice Aitchison was born on July 18, 1908, in Portland, Oregon. She graduated from Goucher College in 1928 before earning a PhD in mathematics from Johns Hopkins University in 1933. After having difficulty finding employment because of the Great Depression, she then completed a master’s degree in economics at the University of Oregon in 1937.

Aitchison began her work with the federal government in 1938 when she joined the Interstate Commerce Commission, initially working as a statistician. During WWII, she served as a consultant with the Office of Defense Transportation. By 1951 she was the Director of Transportation Research at the Commerce Department, and soon became the Transport Economics Director of the United States Postal Service (USPS). In the 1950s, she directed studies that proved airmail would be more cost-effective than sending mail by train.

One of her most notable awards came in 1961 when she was one of six women chosen from over 25,000 for the United States government’s first Federal Women’s Award. She later used this as leverage to pressure President Lyndon Johnson to ban sex discrimination within the United States government. Aitchison was the first woman to hold a policy-level appointment at the USPS and she worked in this capacity until her retirement in 1971, when she was the highest-ranking woman to ever serve in the Post Office Department’s transportation bureau since its establishment in 1775.

Until her death in 1997, Aitchison volunteered with her church and the Red Cross. She also offered legal counsel to senior citizens in her community.

References

“Alumni News.” Edited by Billie Walker, Johns Hopkins Magazine, June 1997

“Equal Opportunities ‘on Paper.’” Chapter 1: Women in Postal History, Smithsonian National Postal Museum

Pearson, R. Retired postal official Beatrice Aitchison dies. 29 Sept. 1997

Green, J. and LaDuke, J. Pioneering Women in American Mathematics: the Pre-1940 PhD’s. American Mathematical Society, 2009.

Jacqueline (Jackie) Akinpelu (b. 1953)

Jacqueline (Jackie) Akinpelu is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government; to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Jacqueline Akinpelu grew up in Winston Salem, North Carolina in the 1960s. She earned a BA in mathematics from Duke University in 1975, graduating magna cum laude. She obtained her PhD in Mathematical Sciences in 1980 from John Hopkins University, where she wrote her thesis on a topic in inventory systems management. 

After her graduate studies, Akinpelu was hired by AT&T’s Bell Laboratories. During her more than 25-year career there, she held various positions, eventually overseeing a team of over 200 people and a budget of up to $36 million. During this time, she modeled the behavior of a new methodology for planning and managing telephone network call capacity under non-engineered traffic conditions. She also worked with a team to develop strategies for maintaining the network’s stability under all network conditions. This work was vital to the evolution of AT&T’s long-distance network. She also had a great influence on improving the workplace environment at AT&T and shaped their minority recruitment program.

In 2006, Akinpelu joined the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL) as an intelligence systems engineer. She built an outreach program between JHUAPL and Morgan State University in order to prepare their students for professional careers. In 2009, she received the Women of Color Technology Award for Career Achievement in Government.  Over her industrial career, Akinpelu used algebra, operations research, probability and statistics, and stochastic models for her various projects.

Click here for a video interview with Meet a Mathematician!

References

Black History Month 2019 Honoree: Jacqueline Akinpelu, Mathematically Gifted and Black, Feburary 2019.

Dr. Jacqueline Akinpelu, LinkedIn

Women of Color. 2009 Women of Color Award Winners. Autumn 2009, Vol. 8, No.1.

Grace Alele-Williams (b. 1932)

Grace Alele-Williams is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Grace Alele-Williams graduated with a Honors degree in mathematics in 1954 from the University of Ibadan in Nigeria. She taught math for a few years in Nigeria before moving to the University of Vermont in 1957. Alele-Williams then earned her PhD in mathematics education from the University of Chicago in 1963, becoming the first Nigerian woman to earn a doctorate in any subject.

Alele-Williams joined the faculty at the University of Lagos, Nigeria in 1965. She went on to become the first female full professor of mathematics education in 1974. For over a decade, Alele-Williams participated in and studied the Entebbe Mathematics Series, a sequence of mathematical workshops held in multiple African cities. She has several publications related to improving the educational system and also published a book, Modern Mathematics Handbook for Teachers.

Alele-Williams has earned many awards and honors for her contributions to mathematics education including the Order of the Niger in 1987, a Merit Award of Bendel State in Nigeria and an honorary doctorate from the University of Benin. She was also elected a Fellow of the Mathematical Association of Nigeria and a Fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Education.

Alele-Williams took on leadership roles, including Regional Vice President for Africa of the Third World Organization for Women in Science, and chair of the African Mathematical Union Commission for Women in Mathematics. She was the first woman to hold a Vice-Chancellor position at any African university (at the University of Benin). Alele-Williams was also a member of the governing council of UNESCO Institute of Education, and a consultant to UNESCO’s Institute of International Education Planning.

References

https://mathshistory.st-andrews.ac.uk/Biographies/Alele-Williams/  

http://www.math.buffalo.edu/mad/PEEPS/williams_grace_alele.html

https://www.agnesscott.edu/lriddle/women/williams.htm

https://everipedia.org/wiki/lang_en/professor-grace-alele-williams

Carolina Araujo (b. 1976)

Carolina Araujo is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Araujo was born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The daughter of two engineers, Araujo loved mathematics since high school and was interested in studying either engineering or physics. It wasn’t until her first serious mathematics course—a course in analysis— that she found her calling in mathematics.

After earning a degree in mathematics from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro in 1998, she earned a PhD in 2004 at Princeton University under the supervision of János Kollár. She went on to become a postdoc at the Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e Aplicada in Brazil (IMPA) before getting a tenure track position there.

Araujo’s research is in the field of complex algebraic geometry, with a focus on birational geometry, Fano varieties, and foliations. She has supervised 5 PhD students. Currently, she is a full researcher at IMPA. At the time of her promotion, she was the only woman with a permanent research position at IMPA. She is also a Simons Associate at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP).

In 2008, Araujo won the L’Oreal Award for Women in Science in Brazil. In 2018 she was among the organizers and speakers at the International Congress of Mathematicians and led the inaugural World Meeting for Women in Mathematics, (WM)^2. She also served as the 2018 Vice President of IMU’s Committee for Women in Mathematics, and was profiled in the committee’s documentary Journeys of Women in Mathematics. In 2020, Araujo was awarded the Ramanujan Prize from the International Centre for Theoretical Physics.

References

Carolina Araujo, Interview, January 2017 Newsletter from EWM no.28 

Carolina Araujo (mathematician), Wikipedia Article

Carolina Araujo, Cibercoloquio Latinoamericano de Matemáticas: Sesiones pasadas

Roberts, S. Q&A: A Movement to Close the Gender Gap in Mathematics, Quanta Magazine, January 22, 2019

Joan Birman (b. 1927)

Joan Birman is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Joan Birman is an American mathematician born on May 30, 1927 in New York City. She specializes in low-dimensional topology and has made major contributions to the study of knots, 3-manifolds, mapping class groups of surfaces, geometric group theory, contact structures, and dynamical systems. Birman completed her PhD at the Courant Institute at NYU in 1969. This was followed by a postdoc at Stevens Institute of Technology during which she introduced the Birman exact sequence (an important tool in the study of braids and surfaces), taught as a visiting professor at Princeton University, and published a monograph containing the first comprehensive treatment of braid theory. She is currently a research professor emerita at Barnard College, Columbia University, where she has been a faculty member since 1973.

Over the course of her career, Birman has written over 70 research articles, more than a dozen expository articles, and 5 books. The Mathematical Association of America awarded Birman the 1996 Chauvenet Prize for expository writing for her article “New points of view in knot theory,” which appeared in the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society 28 (April 1993).

In 1987 Birman was selected by the AWM as Noether Lecturer, an honor for women who have made fundamental and sustained contributions to the mathematical sciences. She has had 21 PhD graduate students of whom 7 were female. Her advisees have in turn mentored over 50 more PhDs. She has also sponsored the AWM Joan & Joseph Birman Research Prizes, and the Joan and Joseph Birman Fellowship for Women Scholars at the American Mathematical Society to support mathematical research by mid-career women. Birman was named to the 2020 class of AWM Fellows.

References

Curriculum Vitae (2017)  

AMS Notices Interview  

Columbia University Home Page

MacTutor Bio

Agnes Scott Website Bio

Birman Fellowship Information

Mathematics Genealogy Project

Lenore Blum (b. 1942)

Lenore Blum is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government;to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Lenore Blum, born in 1942 in New York, graduated with a BS from Simmons College in 1963 and earned a PhD in Mathematics from MIT in 1968. She was then a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California at Berkeley, working with Julia Robinson, before joining the Faculty at Mills College in 1973.

In 1971 Blum became one of the founders of the Association for Women in Mathematics, of which she was also the president from 1975 to 1978. At Mills College, Blum founded the Mathematics and Computer Science Department, which was the first Computer Science program at a women’s college. For this, she was named the first Letts-Villard Chair in 1979. Blum worked at IBM for a year during her time at Mills. She became the Distinguished Career Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in 1999. There, she founded the Women@SCS program to provide mentoring for women in computer science, Project Olympus, a successful business incubator, and co-founded the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE). The Women@SCS program was so effective that CMU computer science majors are nearly half women. In 2018, Lenore Blum resigned from CMU after unsuccessfully fighting systemic sexism caused by changes in the management structure of the CIE.

Blum works in complexity theory and computation. She is well known for the Blum-Blum-Shub pseudorandom number generator and the Blum-Shub-Smale machine, a model of computation over the reals with analogues of NP-completeness, undecidability and universality.

Blum received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring in 2005. She has been named Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1979), the American Mathematical Society (2012), and the Association for Women in Mathematics (2018).

References

Blum, L. Computing over the Reals: Where Turing Meets Newton, October 2004 Notices of the AMS.

Blum, L. A brief history of the Association for Women in Mathematics: the Presidents’ perspectives, September 1991 Notices of the AMS.

Blum, L.; Blum, M; Shub, M. A simple unpredictable pseudorandom number generator, SIAM Journal on Computing, 15 (2): 364–383, 1986.

Blum, Lenore. A new simple homotopy algorithm for linear programming. I, Journal of Complexity, 4 (2), 1988.

Blum, Lenore; Shub, M.; Smale, S. On a theory of computation and complexity over the real numbers: NP-completeness, recursive functions and universal machines, Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, New Series, 21 (1), 1989.

Blum, Lenore; Cucker, Felipe; Shub, M.; Smale, S. Complexity and Real Computation, New York: Springer-Verlag, 1998.

Jo Boaler (b. 1964)

Jo Boaler is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

Jo Boaler was educated at the University of Liverpool and started her career as a secondary mathematics teacher in London before completing graduate work at Kings College, London.  Her dissertation was recognized with the British Education Research Association’s award for best PhD in Education 1997. The following year Boaler was hired at the Stanford Graduate School of Education, where she was promoted to full professor of Mathematics Education in 2006. During a term appointment at Sussex University, Boaler was awarded the 2007 Marie Curie Foundation Chair of Excellence. She returned to Stanford in 2010 as Nomellini-Olivier Professor of Mathematics Education.

Boaler’s work has focused on approaches to learning mathematics that lead to student success.  Her research showed the effectiveness of the use of active learning strategies and reasoning about methods.  Recently her research has centered on the relationship between making mistakes and cultivating a growth mindset in mathematics.

Boaler is co-founder and faculty director of youcubed, a math education center at Stanford that works to promote a growth mindset in mathematics. Since 2013, over 60,000 people have taken the online course How to Learn Math for Teachers offered by youcubed.  

Boaler was president of the International Organization of Women and Mathematics Education from 2000–2004.  She was awarded a Presidential Early Career Award from the National Science Foundation in 2000 and received the NCSM Equity Award in 2014.  Her work has been described in popular media outlets such as The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Telegraph, TIME magazine, and The Wall Street Journal.

References

Jo Boaler, Wikipedia, August 20, 2020.

You-cubed:  https://www.youcubed.org/

Stanford Bio:  https://ed.stanford.edu/faculty/joboaler

Inside Higher Ed:  https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/10/15/stanford-professor-goes-public-attacks-over-her-math-education-research

Jo Boaler Wants Everyone to Love Math

Education Week:  https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2012/07/03/36boaler.h31.html

Mathematical Mindsets:  https://online.stanford.edu/courses/xeduc215n-mathematical-mindsets

https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-jo-boaler-a480295a/

Sylvia Trimble Bozeman (b. 1947)

Sylvia Trimble Bozeman is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government; to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Sylvia Trimble was born in Camp Hill, Alabama in 1947. She graduated from Alabama A&M College in 1968 with a BS in Mathematics. She then attended Vanderbilt University (which had only integrated the graduate school the year before), where she earned her MS in Mathematics in 1970. By now married to mathematician Robert Bozeman, she moved to Atlanta in 1974 where she joined the faculty at Spelman College.  She earned her PhD at Emory University in 1980.

Bozeman’s initial research focused on operator theory within the field of functional analysis. Early in her career, she realized she wanted to do research in an area that she could better share with middle and high school students. Her research expanded to include image processing, and this work has been funded by the Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, and NASA. 

Bozeman has been a mentor for an entire generation of mathematicians both at Spelman, where she served as chair of the math department for a decade, and in the broader mathematics community.  In 1997 she was the first Black American elected as an MAA Section Governor.  In 1998, after seeing that women were well-prepared mathematically for graduate school, yet still dropped out after the first year, Bozeman co-founded the Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE) summer program to support women moving though graduate school in mathematics. Over 20 years later EDGE is still going strong; over 250 women have attended the program, going on to earn over 100 PhDs.  Bozeman was named an AMS Fellow in 2012. She retired from Spelman in 2013 after thirty-nine years of service. Bozeman was a member of the 2018 inaugural class of AWM fellows and won the inaugural MAA Award for Inclusivity in 2019. In 2021, Mathematically Gifted and Black initiated the Sylvia T. Bozeman Predoctoral Fellowship.

Click here for a video interview with Meet a Mathematician!

References

Bozeman, Sylvia. Personal Interview, The History Makers, December 18, 2012

Mihelich, Peggy. Women in mathematics: Professor Sylvia Bozeman, American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. December 13, 2010.

https://mathematicallygiftedandblack.com/honorees/sylvia-bozeman/ 

http://www.math.buffalo.edu/mad/PEEPS/bozeman_sylviat.html

https://www.msri.org/people/44

https://peoplepill.com/people/sylvia-bozeman/

Susanne Brenner (b. 1958)

Susanne Brenner is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

Susanne Brenner studied both mathematics and German as an undergraduate at West Chester State College (now West Chester University), PA. She earned her Master’s degree at SUNY, Stony Brook and received her PhD in numerical analysis in 1988 from the University of Michigan.  Along with finite element methods, her research interests include scientific computing, computational mechanics/electromagnetics, and PDE-constrained optimization. 

Currently the Boyd Professor at Louisiana State University, Brenner holds a joint appointment with the Department of Mathematics and the Center for Computation and Technology. Brenner has contributed to over 100 publications in the form of refereed journal publications, book chapters, and referred proceedings papers.  Her monograph The Mathematical Theory of Finite Element Methods (with L. R. Scott) is in its third printing by Springer–Verlag, New York.

During the course of her career, she has mentored at least ten doctoral students and at least a dozen researchers in post-doctoral positions.  Since 1989, Brenner has served as PI on numerous grants from the National Science Foundation. 

Brenner received the Humboldt Research Award in 2005 (the first female applied mathematician from the US to receive the award) and the Sonia Kovalevsky Award in 2011. She has been named a Fellow of SIAM (2010), AAAS (2012), the AMS (2013), and the AWM (2020).  Brenner was elected President of SIAM for the 2021–2022 term. Brenner is also an editorial board member for several journals, including SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis, Numerische Mathematik, and Numerical Algorithms, and she is currently the first female managing editor of Mathematics of Computation. She is on the steering committee of the Women in Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing network.

References

Homepage, Sue Brenner

Wikipedia, Susanne Brenner

AWM Website, Fellows Program

https://www.lsu.edu/mediacenter/news/2019/10/16math_brenner_awmfellow.php

Dr. Brenner’s CV

Sylvia Celedón-Pattichis 

Sylvia Celedón-Pattichis is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Sylvia Celedón-Pattichis was born in Salineño, Texas but spent her early years in Miguel Alemán, Tamaulipas, México.  Her family returned to Texas to settle in Rio Grande City. She was the first in her family to finish high school.  In 1990, Celedón-Pattichis earned a Bachelor of Science in Education with Secondary Mathematics and Spanish as teaching concentrations; she then earned her Master’s Degree in Mathematics Education and continued on to complete her PhD in Curriculum and Instruction in 1998 with specializations in Bilingual and Mathematics Education, all from the University of Texas at Austin.  

Celedón-Pattichis has been a full professor at the University of New Mexico since 2013, and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Community Engagement since 2018. She was co-Principal Investigator of the Center for the Mathematics Education of Latinos/as (CEMELA), an NSF-funded project focused on developing theory and practice for how to frame cultural diversity and language as educational assets for the mathematics education of all students. This work involved providing mentorship to dozens of doctoral and postdoctoral fellows to promote integrated knowledge in language, culture, and mathematics.  

She served as co-editor of the 2012 text Beyond Good Teaching: Advancing Mathematics Education for ELLs.  Using pedagogical tools such as classroom vignettes and video clips, this text focuses on how to support ELLs in learning mathematics while deepening their development of language skills. Celedón-Pattichis co-edited two volumes on access and equity in elementary mathematics education, published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

References

University of Texas at Austin College of Education Profile

LATHISMS Website

Video Presentation by Dr. Celedón-Pattichis

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15078601-beyond-good-teaching

Moira Chas (b. 1965)

Moira Chas is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups..

Born in Argentina, Moira Chas found her passion for writing and mathematics early in life. She completed her Licenciatura (combined bachelor’s and master’s degree) at the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina and earned her PhD in 1998 from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain. After the completion of her doctorate, Chas visited the United States for a short work trip and never left. She joined the faculty at Stony Brook University in 2002 and currently holds the rank of Associate Professor. She has supervised one PhD student.

Chas works in algebraic, combinatorial, and geometry topology, specializing in curves on surfaces. She co-invented “string topology” and has also published on the history of the Boole family. She seeks ways to make concepts in low dimensional topology more accessible via art, especially using drawings and crocheted surfaces.

Chas provides many resources on her website: There is a section on mathematics outreach ideas, with instructions for Mobius band tricks and activities with bubbles and frames. Another section is on women and mathematics where she gathers articles and resources on issues at the intersection of gender, culture and mathematics. She encourages women and girls to participate in all levels of mathematics. Recent efforts include the 2017 presentation Women in Math given at Topology Ecuador, and serving as presenter and co-organizer of the Girl Power in STEM celebration for International Women’s Day at Stony Brook University (2018).

Chas won the 2017 College of Arts and Sciences Teaching Excellence award at Stony Brook University. She was also cited by the Simons Center Science Playwriting Competition for her play The Mathematical Visions of Alicia Boole, which was staged at several international venues.

References

Lathisms 2017 Podcast, Moira Chas, Professor of Mathematics, Stony Brook University

Imagine, An Essay by Moira Chas

Moira Chas, Stony Brook University Homepage

Press for Power! (International Women’s Day)

“Women in Math”, Topology Ecuador 2017 

String Topology, Wikipedia

Eugenia Cheng (Eugenia Loh-Gene Cheng, 鄭樂雋)

Eugenia Cheng is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Eugenia Cheng earned her PhD at the University of Cambridge in 2002, where she had earlier completed the Mathematical Tripos. Currently, she is a Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Honorary Visiting Fellow at City, University of London, having previously been tenured at the University of Sheffield.

Cheng published over a dozen research papers in category theory in the two decades following her PhD. Making a deliberate shift in professional focus toward broadening interest in mathematics, Cheng has authored several successful books appealing to the general reader, including How to Bake Pi (2015) (a book about baking and category theory), Beyond Infinity (2017) (set theory for the lay audience), The Art of Logic in an Illogical World (2018) (arguments on real-world topics using methods from logic theory), and X + Y: A Mathematician’s Manifesto for Rethinking Gender (2020) (a book using category theory to understand complexities of gender and society).

Her work to popularize mathematics has appeared in national media outlets, such as her column Everyday Math in The Wall Street Journal. Other public appearances, such as playing piano with her Möbius Band on TEDxVienna and teaching exponential growth to Stephen Colbert while baking mille-feuilles (a fancy pastry) on The Late Show, further her efforts to put media focus on the power and beauty of mathematics. As a pianist, she was awarded the Sheila Mossman Memorial Award from the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music and was the first recipient of the Brighton and Hove Arts Council Award for the Musician of the Year (2013). In 2013, Cheng founded the Liederstube as an oasis for art song in the Fine Arts Building, in downtown Chicago. She was invited to deliver the American Mathematical Society Erdős Memorial Lecture at the Joint Mathematics Meeting 2023.

References

Dr. Eugenia Cheng Gives Paula Deen a Run For Her Butter, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, November 5, 2015.

Cheng, E. Eugenia Cheng Website, retrieved September 15, 2020

Cheng, E. Everyday Math: The Chaos of Weather Forecasts, The Wall Street Journal, October 3, 2019

Cheng, E. What if Mathematics is the Answer for Progress? TEDxVienna, October 31, 2015

Cheng, E. Why I Don’t Like Being a ‘Female Role Model,’ Bright-Medium, July 7, 2015.

Cheng, E. x + y : A Mathematician’s Manifesto for Rethinking Gender, Profile Books, July 16, 2020

Fan Chung/Chung Graham, Fan-Rong King (b. 1949)

Fan Chung is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government; and to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

Fan Chung was born in Kaohsiung, Taiwan on 9 Oct 1949. As a teenager, she enjoyed geometry and puzzles and her father, an engineer, encouraged her to study mathematics. She attended National Taiwan University and earned a BS in Mathematics. Chung earned the highest marks on the qualifying exam at the University of Pennsylvania, and impressed her future advisor, Herbert Wilf, by taking only one week to find a better proof of a previously solved combinatorics problem. She earned her PhD in 1974 with her thesis “Ramsey Numbers in Multi-Colors.”

Chung worked for twenty years for Bell Labs and Bellcore. During this time, she became a mathematics research group division manager. Fan Chung is currently a Distinguished Professor emeritus of Mathematics and Computer Science at University California, San Diego.

Chung has collaborated with more than 120 mathematicians including both Paul Erdős and her late husband Ron Graham, with whom she wrote 100 of her 300 papers. Across her papers and three books, she has made major contributions in spectral graph theory, complex networks, random and quasi-random graphs, Ramsey theory, and extremal graph theory. Chung has served as editor-in-chief and on the editorial board for many research journals.

She received the Allendoerfer award of the Mathematics Association of America in 1990, was awarded the Akamai Chair in Internet Mathematics in 1998, was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians (1994), was selected as the Noether lecturer in 2009, and was awarded the Paul Erdős chair for combinatorics in 2010. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2002), the American Mathematical Society (2013), and the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (2015). Chung was awarded the Euler Medal in 2017.

References

Albers, D. A profile of Fan Chung. September 1995, Math Horizon.

Bonato, A. Interview with a mathematician: Fan Chung Graham. The Intrepid Mathematician. April 27, 2016. 

Butler, S. The Mathematical Life of Fan Chung, March 2020, AMS Notices, 67. 

Chung, F. Fan Chung Graham’s Vita. UCSD Math Department, September 24, 2020.

O’Connor, J.J. and Robertson, E.F. Fan Rong K Chung Graham, Mac Tutor, September 2009. 

Riddle, L. Fan Chung, Biographies of Women Mathematicians. April 29, 2016. 

Marta Civil

Marta Civil is featured for her contributions to mathematics education; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Marta Civil grew up in Barcelona, Spain, and received her undergraduate degree from Universitat de Barcelona. In 1990, she completed her PhD in mathematics education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since then, she has served as a professor at the University of Arizona and at the University of North Carolina. In 2013, she received the Iris M. Carl Leadership Award from TODOS: Mathematics for All. Since 2014, Civil has been the Roy F. Graesser Endowed Chair in the University of Arizona math department.

Equity in mathematics education is the central theme of Civil’s research, with particular focus on the impact of language and socio-cultural factors on teaching and learning mathematics.  She has served as co-editor on several volumes, including Cases for Mathematics Teacher Educators: Facilitating Conversations about Inequities in Mathematics Classrooms (2016),  Latinos/as and Mathematics Education: Research on Learning and Teaching in Classrooms and Communities (2011), Transnational and Borderland Studies in Mathematics Education (2011), Access and Equity: Promoting High-Quality Mathematics in Grades 6-8 (2017), and Mathematical Modeling and Modeling Mathematics (2017).

Civil has worked with several research and outreach projects. These include the Center for the Mathematics Education of Latinos/as, an interdisciplinary multi-university collaboration; Math and Parent Partnerships in the Southwest, which supports parental involvement in mathematics education;  Girls in the SYSTEM, which advocates for STEM education for elementary and middle-school girls, especially Mexican American, Native American, and economically underprivileged girls in southern Arizona; and Project Bridge, which develops curricula based on minority and low-income students’ background and real-world knowledge.

References

Civil, Marta. University of Arizona Department of Mathematics, April 2008.

Javier, Jeffrey. A personal approach to mathematics. Arizona Alumni, Summer 2016

Lathisms 2019: Marta Civil

https://profiles.arizona.edu/person/martac

https://www.terc.edu/profiles/marta-civil/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marta_Civil

Alissa Susan Crans (b. 1977)

Alissa Susan Crans is featured for her contributions to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Alissa Crans is an American mathematician who works in algebraic topology, knot theory, and algebra, with over 20 publications and 5 research grants. She earned her PhD in 2004 from the University of California at Riverside in Lie 2-algebras. She is a full professor at Loyola Marymount University and has held visiting and sabbatical positions at the University of Chicago, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the National Security Agency.  

Crans is a leader in mentoring and community building through her roles as the Associate Director of Project NExT, the Associate Director of Diversity and Education at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, and as PI on the NSF grant that funded the Pacific Coast Undergraduate Mathematics Conference. The latter won the AMS’s Programs That Make a Difference award. She has mentored at all levels, including giving PATHWAYS presentations for middle and high school students in LA, and teaching at both the Carleton College Summer Mathematics Program for Women and the Summer Program for Women in Mathematics at George Washington University.

She won the MAA’s Henry L. Alder Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Beginning College/University Mathematics Faculty Member in 2011, the MAA’s Merten M. Hasse Award in 2011 for her paper “Musical Actions of Dihedral Groups,” and was a MAA Distinguished Lecturer in 2014.  Crans is also a 2020 AWM Fellow.  

References

Nanayakkara, P.   Engaging with the Ensemble: Mathematics AWM Newsletter Volume 46, Number 3 May-June 2016 

Crans, A., Fiore, T. and Satyendra, R. Musical Actions of Dihedral Groups The American Mathematical Monthly Vol. 116, No. 6 (Jun. – Jul., 2009)

Merow, K. A Surreptitious Sequence: The Catalan Numbers

https://awm-math.org/awards/awm-fellows/2020-awm-fellows/ 

https://www.msri.org/people/staff/acrans/

https://acrans.lmu.build/CransCV.pdf 

Marianna Csörnyei (b. 1975)

Marianna Csörnyei is featured for her contributions to research mathematics.

Marianna Csörnyei is a Hungarian-born research mathematician who is currently a full professor at the University of Chicago. Born October 8, 1975, she showed early interest and talent in mathematics, attending the prestigious Fazekas Mihaly Gimnasium in Budapest, winning a gold medal in the 1993 International Mathematical Olympiad in Istanbul, and placing first in the Hungarian mathematics Miklós Schweitzer competition in 1996. She carried out her doctoral studies at Eötvös Loránd University, completing her dissertation Investigations in Geometrical Measure Theory on the Plane and in Banach Spaces under György Petruska in 1999.

Csörnyei became a research fellow and then Professor of Mathematics at University College, London, where she was awarded the Leverhulme Prize in 2008 for her contributions to geometric measure theory. She was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton from 2003–2004, and was a visiting scholar at Yale University for 2009–2010. She joined the Mathematics Department at University of Chicago in 2011.

Csörnyei works in real analysis, geometric measure theory, and geometric nonlinear functional analysis. Early in her career she established herself as a premier analyst. She settled multiple substantial problems, including providing a proof of the equivalence of the Aronszajn zero, cube zero, Haar zero and Gauss zero sets in separable Banach spaces, demonstrating solutions of the Gorelik principle problem by finding counterexamples in finite dimensional spaces, and of the scaling problem for Hausdorff measures, among other significant contributions to the field. Csörnyei has supervised three doctoral students.

Csörnyei was an invited speaker at the 2010 International Congress of Mathematicians and is the 2022 AWM Noether Lecturer. She was awarded the Whitehead Prize and the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award, both in 2002, and was elected to the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 2019.

References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marianna_Cs%C3%B6rnyei

https://mathematics.uchicago.edu/people/profile/marianna-csoernyei/

https://awm-math.org/awards/noether-lectures/noether-lectures-2022/

 Ingrid Daubechies (b. 1954)

 Ingrid Daubechies is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Ingrid Daubechies was born on August 7th, 1954, in Houthalen, Belgium. She received her PhD from Vrije Universiteit Brussel in theoretical physics. In 1986, while a guest lecturer at the Courant Institute, Daubechies solved an open problem in digital signal processing by describing a system of wavelets that enabled much faster processing. This led to breakthroughs in image processing, fingerprint recognition, and art restoration. She joined Bell Laboratories in 1987. There, she became a leading authority on wavelet theory. Daubechies was awarded the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship in 1992. In 1994, she accepted a position at Princeton University.

In 2011, the same year she moved to Duke University as the James B. Duke Professor, Daubechies was elected President of the International Mathematical Union. While President of the IMU, Daubechies helped create the IMU Committee for Women in Mathematics and expanded the volunteer lecturer program that provides universities in developing countries with lecturers in advanced mathematics. She is on the board of directors of Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE), a program that helps women entering graduate studies in the mathematical sciences. Daubechies has supervised 28 PhD students, 7 of them women.

Her many accolades include the AMS Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize, awarded in 1997. Daubechies is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; she was the first woman to receive the National Academy of Sciences Award in Mathematics (2000) and the first woman to be full professor of mathematics at Princeton. She was the Noether Lecturer at the JMM in 2006, won the Steele Prize in 2011 for Ten Lectures on Wavelets, and the 2019 L’Oreal-UNESCO For Women in Science Award.

References

Smith, Robin. “Of Heartbeats, Bones, and Brushstrokes” Duke Today. August 1, 2016

Michelson, Joan. “8 Tips For Generating Creative Ideas From The Mind Of A ‘Genius’ Woman Scientist“ Forbes. May 28, 2019.

Ingrid Daubechies Receives NAS Award in Mathematics, Notices of the AMS Volume 47, Number 5

Alumni Profile from Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Retrieved September 18, 2020.

Ingrid Daubechies: A Mathematical Revolution for Data compression. UNESCO. March 13, 2019.

Profile of Ingrid Daubechies from the International Mathematical Union. Retrieved September 17, 2020.

“Prof. Ingrid Daubechies- 2019 L’Oréal-UNESCO Laureate for North America” YouTube, uploaded by Fondation L’Oreal, March 19, 2019.

“Daubechies transfers to emeritus status” by the Office of Communications at Princeton University. November 30, 2012.

Starckx, Senne. “Flemish professor on how maths can change the world” Flanders Today. October 15, 2014.

Biographies of Women Mathematicians: Ingrid Daubechies. From Agnes Scott College. July 11, 2019.

Macarthur Profile of Ingrid Daubechies. July 1, 1992.

Etta Zuber Falconer (1933–2002)

Etta Zuber Falconer is featured for her contributions to mathematics education; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Etta Falconer was born in Tupelo, Mississippi in 1933. After receiving an AB in Mathematics from Fisk University and her MS from the University of Wisconsin, she worked as an instructor and teacher throughout the southern United States. While beginning her graduate study, Falconer experienced non-segregated schools for the first time, and often found her credibility challenged. During her time as an Assistant Professor at Spelman College in Atlanta, Falconer completed her PhD in abstract algebra at Emory University in 1969. This achievement made her the thirteenth Black woman to earn a PhD in mathematics in the United States. Later (1982), she was one of the first women in the United States to receive a Masters in Computer Science.

After working as an assistant professor of mathematics at Norfolk State University, she returned to Spelman, becoming the Chair of the mathematics department from 1972–1985 as well as the chair of the Natural Sciences Division from 1975–1990. At Spelman, Falconer introduced computer science classes, and in 1987 she introduced the NASA Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Program, to expose young female students to opportunities in math or science. Of the more than 320 women who have participated in WISE since 1987, more than half have received graduate degrees, and at least 50 have earned doctoral degrees.

In 1995 Etta Z. Falconer was given the Louise Hay Award by the AWM for outstanding achievements in mathematics education. In addition, Falconer received two Spelman College Faculty Awards, the United Negro College Fund’s Distinguished Faculty Award (1986), the National Association of Mathematicians Distinguished Service Award (1994), and the AAAS Mentor Award for Lifetime Achievement (2001).

References

Williams, Black Women In Math, 2008

O’Conner, n.d.

A Wise Choice-NASA

https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/falconer-etta-zuber

Morrow, Charlene; Perl, Teri (1998). Notable Women in Mathematics: A Biographical Dictionary. p. 43

Lisa Fauci (b. 1960)

Lisa Fauci is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

Lisa Fauci, born September 1960 in Brooklyn, New York, is an applied mathematician whose interdisciplinary research intersects scientific computing and biology. In 1981, she graduated from Pace University with her BS in mathematics, and she earned her PhD in mathematics from New York University’s Courant Institute for Mathematical Sciences in 1986. That year she also joined the faculty of Tulane University in New Orleans, where she was later named the Pendergraft Nola Lee Haynes Professor of Mathematics. In 2001, she founded Tulane’s Center for Computational Science to promote further study in that field. Fauci has mentored 13 PhD students, 6 of them women, and also many post-doctoral students.

Fauci’s work in computational and biological fluid dynamics involves understanding processes such as the neuromechanics of aquatic locomotion, phytoplankton dynamics in the ocean, and sperm motility in human reproduction. For this innovative work, Fauci was selected by the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) to be the Sonia Kovalesky Lecturer at the 2016 SIAM annual meeting and as an invited speaker at the Eighth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics in Beijing, China in August 2015.

Fauci was named an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in 1992, a fellow of SIAM in 2012, a fellow of the American Physical Society in 2018, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2019, a fellow of the American Mathematical Society in 2020 for “contributions to computational fluid dynamics and applications, and for service to the applied mathematical community”, and a fellow of the AWM in 2023. Fauci also served as the President of SIAM (2019–2020).

References

Lisa Fauci, Wikipedia. June 2020.

Lisa Fauci, Tulane University Mathematics Department. 

Lisa Fauci Brief Biography, The 8th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics. August 2015.

Q&A with the ANZIAM 2014 Female Plenary Speakers, ANZIAM 2014, Rotorua, New Zealand. February 2014. 

Association for Women in Mathematics. Lisa Fauci to be AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalesky Lecturer, press release. March 28, 2015. 

https://www.ams.org/fellows_by_year.cgi?year=2020

Joan Feigenbaum (b. 1958)

Joan Feigenbaum is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government; and establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

Joan Feigenbaum is the Grace Murray Hopper Professor of Computer Science at Yale University, where she works in the fields of security and privacy, internet algorithmics, and computational complexity.  She co-invented the computer-security research area of trust management. 

Her BA in mathematics is from Harvard University in 1981. Between her junior and senior undergraduate years, she attended the Summer Research Program at AT&T’s Bell Labs, which sparked her interest in computer science. Feigenbaum earned a PhD in Computer Science from Stanford in 1986. She had worked at AT&T’s Bell Labs during summers starting in 1980 and moved to full-time work at  AT&T Laboratories on finishing graduate school. There, she created and managed a research group in Algorithms and Distributed Data. 

Feigenbaum played a key role in the early years of Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science (DIMACS), including her work as an editor for the DIMACS Book Series and co-director of the 1997 DIMACS Research and Education Institute summer program on cryptography and network security.  She served as a co-organizer of the DIMACS Special Year on Massive Data Sets, the Special Focus on Next Generation Networks Technologies and Applications, and the Special Focus on Computation and the Socio-Economic Sciences.

Feigenbaum was an invited speaker at the 1998 International Congress of Mathematicians. She was named a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) in 2001 and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2012. Feigenbaum was named an Amazon Scholar in 2018. In 2020, she was awarded the Test of Time Award from the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy for a paper she published in 1996, and she was elected Vice President of the ACM (2020–2022).

References

Joan Feigenbaum Named the Grace Murray Hopper Professor, Yale News, July 18, 2008.  

People of ACM – Joan Feigenbaum, Association for Computing Machinery. February 21, 2017. 

World’s Most Influential Computing Society Announces Newly-Elected Leadership, GlobeNewswire, May 29, 2020.  

http://dimacs.rutgers.edu/events/details?eID=1439

AAAS Members Elected as Fellows, Science, 338: 1168-1171, November 30, 2012. doi: 10.1126/science.338.6111.1166.

Sophie Germain/Marie-Sophie Germain (1776–1831)

Sophie Germain is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Sophie Germain was born to a wealthy family in Paris on April 1, 1776. She was exposed to philosophical and political conversations through her father’s colleagues and acquaintances. In her early teens, Germain began reading texts in her father’s library and began studying mathematics on her own, advancing her knowledge to the point that she could read the works of Newton and Euler. Initially, Germain’s parents tried to deter her from her studies, and legend has it her parents confiscated her heat and candle at night to prevent her studying.

While denied the opportunity to attend mathematics lectures at the Ecole Polytechnique, Germain was able to advance her studies by obtaining notes from various courses.  Germain adopted the pseudonym Monsieur LeBlanc and entered into correspondence on questions in analysis with Joseph-Louis Lagrange, and later corresponded with Gauss about her work on Fermat’s Last Theorem for odd primes p < 100.  Lagrange and Gauss separately learned of Germain’s identity.  Lagrange became her ally and mentor, helping her gain access to the academic world of mathematics and science, and Gauss praised both the quality of her mathematical work and her perseverance given societal constraints.

In 1816, Germain submitted a paper on elasticity under her own name and became the first woman to win a prize from the Paris Academy of Sciences. Germain continued to publish mathematical research while suffering from breast cancer, and died at the age of 55, on June 27, 1831. In a final demonstration of his regard for her work Gauss convinced the University of Gottingen to posthumously award Germain an honorary degree. Since 2003, the French Academy of Sciences has awarded the annual Sophie Germain Prize.

References

PBS Online, Math’s Hidden Woman, November 2000 

Barrow-Green, June. Sophia Germain, Encyclopedia Britannica, June 23, 2020

Swift, Amanda. Sophie Germain, “Biographies of Women Mathematicians”, “Agnes Scott College”, July 2001

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophie_Germain

Gray, Mary W. (2005). “Sophie Germain”. In Bettye Anne Case; Anne M. Leggett (eds.). Complexities: Women in Mathematics. Princeton University Press. pp. 68–75. ISBN 0-691-11462-5.

Gray, Mary (1978). “Sophie Germain (1776–1831)”. In Louise S. Grinstein; Paul Campbell (eds.). Women of Mathematics: A Bibliographic Sourcebook. Greenwood. pp. 47–55. ISBN 978-0-313-24849-8.

Mackinnon, Nick (1990). “Sophie Germain, or, Was Gauss a feminist?”. The Mathematical Gazette. 74 (470): 346–351. doi:10.2307/3618130.

Singh, Simon. Fermat’s Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World’s Greatest Mathematical Problem, Walker and Company, 1997

Concha Gómez (Concetta Gómez)

Concha Gómez is featured for her contributions to mathematics education; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Concha Gómez’s academic career began by studying for two years at University of Wisconsin-Madison, but because of a lack of funds, she did not continue. She moved to San Francisco and attended classes at City College of San Francisco, then transferred to University of California, Berkeley from which she earned a BA in mathematics in 1989 and a mathematics PhD in 2000. While a doctoral student in 1991, she co-founded the Noetherian Ring, a group that allows gender minority graduate students, postdocs, and professors in mathematics to learn about each other and their research. Gómez served as president twice. It was around this time that Gomez was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis.

After graduating, Gómez was an assistant professor at Middlebury College and then returned to University of Wisconsin-Madison as associate faculty. She was the Director of the Wisconsin Emerging Scholars program, which promotes the retention of minority STEM students. During this time, Gómez was profiled in the online Science magazine. Because Wisconsin banned both same-sex marriage and civil unions in the mid-2000s, Gómez and her partner left the state for California, where she took a position as the Retention and Equity Director at the Center for Science and Mathematics Education at San Francisco State University. Since August 2016, she has been a professor of mathematics at Diablo Valley College teaching mathematics courses utilizing student-centered and collaborative learning techniques. One of her initiatives at Diablo Valley is an interdisciplinary network of Latinx professors who support Latinx students. She has also worked with the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science.

References

Concha (Concetta) Gómez, LinkedIn, Accessed September 23, 2020.

The Noetherian Ring, Women in the Department of Mathematics at UC Berkeley, Accessed September 23, 2020.

Joanna Pliner, Ban drives faculty away, The Badger Herald, December 6, 2006

Edna Francisco, Concha Gómez: A Math Guru for Women and Minorities, Science, American Association for the Advancement of Science, ScienceMag, May 13, 2005.

Eva Recinos, Latinas hold only 2% of STEM jobs. These 5 women are working to fix that., Mashable, September 6, 2018.

Concha Gómez, Wikipedia, Accessed September 23, 2020.

Rochelle Gutiérrez

Rochelle Gutiérrez is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Rochelle Gutiérrez grew up in San José, California. In 1990, she received her bachelor’s degree in human biology at Stanford University. She earned both a master’s degree in social sciences and a PhD in education in 1995 from the University of Chicago. In 1998–1999, Gutiérrez was a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation postdoctoral fellow. 

Gutiérrez is now a full professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she has worked since 1996. In 2004, as a Fulbright scholar, she studied cultural practices and algorithms used in secondary mathematics classrooms in Zacatecas, México.

Gutiérrez’s research uses longitudinal ethnographic studies to examine the ways in which race, class, and language affect mathematics teaching and learning. In her 2018 book, Rehumanizing Mathematics for Black, Indigenous, and Latinx Students, Gutiérrez challenges deficit views of mathematical ability and argues that mathematics teachers can be successful if they are equipped with content, pedagogical and political  knowledge. She has published upwards of thirty articles related to these themes.

Gutiérrez received the 2011 Outstanding Mathematics Teacher Educator Award for Excellence in Scholarship from the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators. In 2016, she received the Iris M. Carl Equity and Leadership Award from TODOS Mathematics for All for making significant contributions to the quality of mathematics education provided to underserved students.  In addition, Gutiérrez received the 2020 AERA Division K Innovations in Research on Equity and Social Justice in Teacher Education Award.

References

Faculty Profiles.” College of Education

Lanius, Melinda and Sisneros-Thiry, Simone. Rochelle Gutiérrez Interview. Notices of the AMS, Volume 65, Number 7. August 2018. 

“Rochelle Gutiérrez.” Lathisms

Rosemary Guzman

Rosemary Guzman is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Rosemary Guzman is a Mexican American mathematician who works in hyperbolic 3-manifolds and geometric group theory.  She was born and raised in Chicago, receiving her BA in mathematics from Northwestern University in 2001 and her MS from Loyola University Chicago in 2003 before earning her PhD in 2011 at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Guzman was an NSF Alliance Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Iowa and an AAUW American Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Chicago. 

She served twice as Assistant Director of the Illinois Geometry Lab at the University of Illinois (in Urbana-Champaign), where Guzman is a Teaching Assistant Professor. Her work with the Illinois Geometry Lab has included supervising undergraduate research.

Before starting her PhD program, Guzman worked with Northwestern’s Minority Engineering Opportunity Program and Robert Morris University’s Upward Bound Program.  As a faculty member, she has co-organized three conference sessions focusing on inclusion of women and other traditionally underrepresented groups in mathematics. Guzman has been an invited speaker in the IPAM Latinos in the Mathematical Sciences Conference in 2015 and 2018. She was the keynote speaker for Florida Atlantic University’s Florida Women in Math Day in 2019.  Guzman was featured in the Notices of the AMS during Women’s History Month in 2018 and was also selected by Soapbox Science to deliver a talk for the general public as an outstanding early career woman in STEM.

References

Women’s History Month. March 2018 Notices of the AMS 268

Geometry Labs United: An Invitation, Communication. October 2018 Notices of the AMS 1088

Soapbox Science 2018 Chicago

Illinois Geometry Lab website

Prof. Guzman’s Professional website

Margaret Heafield Hamilton (b. 1936)

Margaret Heafield Hamilton is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and mathematics in business, industry and government.

Margaret Heafield Hamilton was born on August 17, 1936 in Paoli, Indiana. She graduated from Earlham College in 1958 with a BA in mathematics and a minor in philosophy. After briefly teaching both high school mathematics and French, Hamilton moved to Boston to study graduate mathematics at Brandeis University. However, in the summer of 1959, she began working at the meteorology lab at MIT, teaching herself programming and writing software to predict weather. She later wrote software to track satellites and further developed her weather prediction software to track systems. Hamilton worked on the SAGE system software, designed to track enemy airplanes, from 1961–63.

Later she became the director of the software engineering division at the Draper Lab, and after which she was hired by NASA in the mid-1960’s. There, Hamilton supervised over 100 mathematicians, programmers, and engineers to develop the command module software for the Apollo 11 mission. In particular, her error detection and recovery software allowed the lunar module to handle an “overload” alarm and prioritize the landing sequence three minutes before touching down on the moon.

After Apollo, Hamilton founded two software companies: Higher Order Systems, and Hamilton Technologies, Inc. She is one of the people credited with coining the term “software engineering.” In 1989, she won the Augusta Ada Lovelace Award from the Association for Women in Computing. Hamilton also received the NASA Exceptional Space Act Award in 2003, and in 2016 she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

References

Apollo Guidance Computer History Project

The NASA Heritage of Creativity 2003, Annual Report of the NASA Inventions & Contributions Board

Pioneers in CS: Margaret Hamilton, 14 March 2015, Utah State University

Software — and a Woman — at the Heart of Lunar Triumph, Wired, August 2014

Her Code Got Humans on the Moon—And Invented Software

Pamela E. Harris (b. 1983)

Pamela E. Harris is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Pamela E. Harris emigrated from Mexico to the US twice, the second time at the age of twelve when her family settled in Wisconsin. Because of her immigration status, she was unable to enroll at a four-year college after finishing high school, so she completed coursework at a local community college. After Harris’s immigration status changed she completed a Bachelor’s degree  in mathematics. Harris joined  the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s PhD program when her daughter was 4 months old.  She was a solo parent throughout her graduate work because her husband, a US Marine, was stationed overseas. Harris earned her PhD in 2012.

Harris works in algebraic combinatorics and in representation theory. She published more than 40 research papers in less than 10 years and gave more than 35 invited research talks in under 5 years.

Since 2016, Harris has been on the mathematics faculty at Williams College, having previously been at the US Military Academy. She was awarded a MAA Henry L. Alder Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Beginning College or University Mathematics Faculty Member in 2019. At the time of the award, she had co-authored sixteen research papers with Williams students. 

Her work in supporting and promoting the work of mathematicians from underrepresented groups has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Security Agency, and the Tensor Foundation. In 2016, she co-founded the Lathisms website.  In 2020, she began co-hosting the Mathematically Uncensored podcast as part of the Center for Minorities in the Mathematical Sciences.*

Harris was the lead editor for the July 2018 Special Issue on Motherhood and Mathematics of the Journal of Humanistic Mathematics, co-wrote Asked and Answered: Dialogues On Advocating For Students of Color in Mathematics in 2020, and is one of the inaugural 2020 Karen EDGE Fellows.

*The first print version of this card incorrectly named Dr. Harris as a co-founder of the Center for Minorities in the Mathematical Sciences. We regret the error.

Click here for a video interview with Meet a Mathematician!

References

Cortez, R., & Ardila, F. (september 2018). Pamela Harris: The Mathematical Rise and Social Contribution of a Dreamer. Notices of the AMS, 65(8), 1025-1026. Retrieved September 7, 2020

Henry L. Alder Awards – Pamela Harris. (2019). Retrieved September 07, 2020

Marks, G. S. (2020, January 16). Five facts about Pamela E. Harris, Mexican-American mathematician and educator of “leaders of character”. Retrieved September 07, 2020

https://blogs.ams.org/mathmentoringnetwork/2015/03/30/the-intersection-of-motherhood-and-graduate-school-the-good-the-bad-and-the-cute-babies

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7qjkro7rkj1hiuj/Harris_CV.pdf?dl=0

Deanna Haunspenger (b. 1964)

Deanna Haunsperger is featured for her contributions to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Deanna Haunsperger was born in Kellogg, Iowa. She earned a BA from Simpson College and a PhD in mathematics from Northwestern University. She is a full professor of mathematics at Carleton College, having joined the faculty there in 1994. In recent years, her work has included mentoring service learning opportunities for undergraduate students and the creation of electronic resources for K-12 educators.

Haunsperger’s research is in population statistics and voting theory. Her editorial work is significant: She co-edited the volumes 101 Careers in Mathematics (2019) and A Century of Advancing Mathematics (2015), and served as one of the first editors of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) Math Horizons magazine for undergraduate students, where she also contributed many expository articles.

One of Haunsperger’s signature achievements is the NSF-funded Carleton College Summer Mathematics Program for Undergraduate Women (SMP), which she co-created and directed for 18 summers. Over 85 women associated with the program completed their doctorates in mathematical sciences; for this, SMP was recognized by the American Mathematical Society as one of the Mathematics Programs that Make a Difference in 2014.

In addition to her contributions to the MAA as author and editor, she has been the chair of the Strategic Planning Group on Students, chair of the Council on Outreach Programs, and co-chair of the Centennial Planning Committee. Haunsperger also served as President of the MAA from 2017–2018.

In 2012, Haunsperger won the AWM Gwyneth Humphreys award for mentorship of undergraduate women in mathematics. She also received the AWM Presidential Award (2017), the MAA Meritorious Service Award (2016), and the MAA Gung-Hu Award (2021).

References

Haunsperger CV

Haunsperger, D. , Aggregated Statistical Rankings are Arbitrary, Social Choice and Welfare, 20 (2003), 261-272.

Haunsperger, D. and Melville, D., Voting Power When Using Preference Ballots, Social Choice and Welfare, 13 (1996), 457–465.

Haunsperger, D. Projection and Aggregation Paradoxes in Non-parametric Statistical Tests, PhD Thesis, North-Western University, under the direction of Donald G. Saari, 1991.

Haunsperger, D. and Thompson, R. (Editors) 101 Careers in Mathematics, 4th Edition, MAA Press, American Mathematical Society, 2019.

Haunsperger, D. Building Supportive Communities in Mathematics in Challenges of Mathematical Education: In An American and Iranian Discussion, D. Saari, Editor Mathematical Association of America, 2014.

Euphemia Lofton Haynes /Martha Euphemia Lofton Haynes (1890–1980)

Euphemia Lofton Haynes is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Martha Euphemia Lofton Haynes earned her PhD, in her early fifties, in 1943 from The Catholic University in Washington DC, making her the first Black American woman to earn a PhD in mathematics. She had a 47-year long teaching career. In Washington DC public schools, she taught a variety of classes including first grade, English, and high-school mathematics. She was also a professor at Miners Teachers College (later part of University of the District of Columbia) where she established the Mathematics Department. During her career, she was also a professor and department chair at the District of Columbia Teachers College and taught part-time at Howard University. After retiring from teaching, she served on the District of Columbia Board of Education from 1960–1968 and was the president from 1966–1967.

Haynes’s work on the Board of Education demonstrated her commitment to Black and poor students. She led the District of Columbia Public School system to abolish its tracking system, a de facto segregation system discriminating against Black and poor students by not preparing them for higher mathematics and college. She also supported a successful yet controversial lawsuit that charged the district with racial and economic discrimination.

Haynes’s commitment to her religious community, women, and the Black community continued after her retirement. She served on and led various boards and committees for organizations including the Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women, the Committee of International Social Welfare, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and the League of Women Voters. Upon her death, she bequeathed $700,000 to Catholic University in a trust fund established to support a professorial chair and student loan fund in the School of Education.

References

O’Connor, J. J.  & Robertson, E. F. Martha Euphemia Lofton Haynes. MacTutor. May 2018. 

Williams, Scott. W. Martha Euphemia Lofton Haynes, First African American Woman Mathematician. Black Women in Mathematics. 

Gloria Conyers Hewitt (b. 1935)

Gloria Conyers Hewitt is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Gloria Conyers Hewitt was born and raised in Sumter, South Carolina. She enrolled at Fisk University in Tennessee, but performed poorly on her entrance exams and was placed in a low-level math class. However, the head of the math department recognized her talent and encouraged her to continue on to calculus. It was in calculus that Hewitt’s interest in mathematics bloomed, and she often worked on calculus problems for recreation.

At age eighteen, she married Ronald Hewitt and had a baby soon after. With her parents’ help, Hewitt returned to Fisk and finished her degree. Undergraduate mentor Lee Lorch had confidence in Hewitt’s mathematical ability and, without her knowledge, recommended her to two graduate schools. As a result, Hewitt was offered a fellowship from the University of Washington without ever applying for it.

For her research in abstract algebra, Hewitt became the fifth Black woman to earn a doctorate in mathematics from the University of Washington in 1962 (under Richard Pierce) and then received a highly prestigious NSF Science Faculty Fellowship.

Hewitt went on to join the faculty at the University of Montana and eventually became the first Black woman to head a mathematics department at the university. She served on the Executive Council of Pi Mu Epsilon and worked with the committee that wrote mathematics questions for the Graduate Records Examination. She was also a reader, table leader and member of the Calculus Development Committee for the Advanced Placement Calculus Program. Hewitt served as a visiting lecturer for the Mathematical Association of America, and additionally served on its Board of Governors.

References

Hensley, Shannon. Biographies of Women Mathematicians. February 2, 2019. 

Joseph, Nancy. Pioneering Women in Mathematical Sciences. July 2018. 

Mathematically Gifted and Black, Black History Month 2018 Honoree. 2018.

O’Connor, J.J. and Robertson, E.F. Gloria Conyers Hewitt. November 2017. 

Dorothy McFadden Hoover (1918–2000)

Dorothy Hoover is featured for her contributions to mathematics in business, industry, and government and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Dorothy Hoover was born in Hope, Arkansas on July 1st, 1918. She graduated high school at the age of fifteen and went on to obtain a BS in mathematics from Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical, and Normal College (now the University of Arkansas) in 1938. 

After graduation, Hoover worked as a teacher in Jesup, Georgia. In 1943, she earned a MS in mathematics from Atlanta University (now Clark Atlanta University). Hoover was the first of six Black women hired as mathematicians at Langley Research Labs, where she worked from 1943–1952. By 1951 she had been promoted to Aeronautical Research Scientist and co-authored two publications on aircraft wings, a major feat since at the time women were not credited on research papers. Her publications were key in the development of America’s first fighter jet.

In 1952, Hoover left Langley to earn a second MS at the University of Arkansas. She then accepted a John Hay Whitney Fellowship at the University of Michigan, a program to match talented Black scholars with competitive graduate programs. Hoover left prematurely in 1956 to work at the US Weather Bureau until 1959, when she started at Goddard Space Flight Center. At Goddard, Hoover continued to publish, and co-authored a book on computational physics.

After retiring, Hoover published a book on the history of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, A Layman Looks with Love at Her Church (1970).

Hoover died on February 7th, 2000, in Washington DC. She is featured in the nonfiction book Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly.

References

Frazier, Lisa. “Don’t Forget Dorothy Hoover, Another Hidden Treasure Once Lost to Black History.”

Frazier, Lisa. “Searching For Dorothy.” Washington Post, 7 May 2000

Khadjavi, Lily, et al. “Shining a Light on a Hidden Figure: Dorothy Hoover.” Notices of the American Mathematical Society, vol. 67, no. 03, 1 Mar. 2020, p. 1

Sallee, Richard D., et al. “Encyclopedia of Arkansas.” Encyclopedia of Arkansas, 10 Feb. 2020

Shetterly, Margot Lee. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race. New York: William Morrow, 2016.

Trachette Levon Jackson (b. 1972)

Trachette Levon Jackson is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Trachette Jackson was born in Monroe, Louisiana on July 24, 1972. She earned her undergraduate degree in mathematics from Arizona State University in 1994 and went on to earn her PhD from the University of Washington in applied mathematics in 1998, specializing in mathematical biology. After postdocs at the University of Minnesota, the Environmental Protection Agency, and Duke University, she joined the faculty at the University of Michigan in 2000.  There she became  a full professor in 2008. She is currently the Professor of Mathematics and University Diversity and Social Transformation Professor. She has been named to a 3-year appointment as UMich’s inaugural Assistant Vice President for Research — Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Initiatives.

Jackson’s research focuses on mathematical oncology and includes modeling tumor growth, cancer chemotherapy, and tumor-related changes to blood vessels. She has (co)authored nearly 50 publications in addition to serving as senior editor for Cancer Research.  Jackson’s edited works include the 2015 Springer volume Applications of Dynamical Systems in Biology and Medicine (co-edited with A. Radunskya) and her 2012 text Modeling Tumor Vasculature: Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Level Aspects and Implications.

Her many accolades include the 2003 Alfred P. Sloan Research Award in mathematics—she was only the second Black American woman to be selected for this honor—and the James S. McDonnell 21st Century Scientist Award (2005). Jackson was awarded the 2010 Blackwell-Tapia Prize (the first woman) and was named a fellow of the AWM in 2017. In 2021, she gave the AMS-MAA-SIAM Gerald and Judith Porter Public Lecture at the Joint Mathematics Meeting and was named a SIAM Fellow.

Among other endeavors that support the next generation of mathematicians, Jackson is the co-director of the Mathematics Biology Research Group (MBRG) and was the co-principal investigator of the SUBMERGE (Supplying Undergraduate Biology and Mathematics Education Research Group Experiences) program at the University of Michigan. Since 2010 Jackson has served as the Director of Marjorie Lee Browne Bridge Program at the University of Michigan, a program that prepares masters students for PhD-level work.  

Click here for a video interview with Meet a Mathematician!

References

Jackson, T. Personal website, University of Michigan.

Trachette Jackson, Mathematically Gifted & Black: Black History Month 2017 Honoree. 

Trachette Jackson, The HistoryMakers, October 22, 2012.

Williams, S. Black Women in Mathematics: Trachette Jackson. Mathematicians of the African Diaspora, 2008.

Williams, T.  Power in Numbers: The Rebel Women of Mathematics, Race Point Publishing, 2018. 

Honoring Trachette L. Jackson-SIAM News Blog 2021

https://sinews.siam.org/Details-Page/siam-announces-class-of-2021-fellows

Lisa Jeffrey (b. 1965)

Lisa Jeffrey is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

Lisa Jeffrey was born in Fort Collins, Colorado in 1965, but her family moved to Canada when she was an infant. When living in Norway with her family, Jeffrey took math classes two years above grade level and earned the highest score on a country-wide exam administered at the end of the school year.

Jeffrey earned her undergraduate degree in physics from Princeton University in 1986. She was awarded a Marshall Scholarship for study in the UK and completed parts II and III of the Mathematical Tripos at Cambridge University. In graduate school, Jeffrey switched to mathematics and completed her PhD at Oxford University in 1991 in symplectic geometry. Jeffrey taught at Princeton University and McGill University prior to joining the University of Toronto faculty in 1997, where she is now a full professor. Her research continues to focus on symplectic geometry and mathematical physics as she employs techniques from pure mathematics to prove results proposed by theoretical physicists. Jeffrey has supervised eighteen PhD students, two of them women, at the University of Toronto, many of whom have gone on to impressive mathematical careers of their own.

Jeffrey has been an invited scholar around the world, including at the Institute for Advanced Study, University of Adelaide, Odense University (now University of Southern Denmark), Institut Henri Poincare, and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute at Berkeley.

Jeffrey has earned multiple awards for her work, including the 2001 Krieger-Nelson Prize and the 2002 Coxeter-James Prize from the Canadian Mathematical Society. Jeffrey is a fellow of both the Royal Society of Canada (2007) and the American Mathematical Society (2012). In 2017, Jeffrey gave the AWM’s Noether Lecture at the Joint Mathematics Meetings.

References

Bonato, A. Interview with a mathematician: Lisa Jeffrey. The Intrepid Mathematician, May 17, 2017.

Emmy Noether Lectures—2017 Lecturer: Lisa Jeffrey. Association for Women in Mathematics, 2017.

The 7th Krieger-Nelson Prize Lecture. Canadian Mathematical Society, 2001.

Nalini Joshi

Nalini Joshi is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Nalini Joshi was born in Burma (now Myanmar) and grew up there and in Australia. Joshi completed undergraduate work at the University of Sydney and went on to complete her PhD in Computational and Applied Mathematics at Princeton University in 1987.  Her research area is nonlinear differential and difference equations, with a focus on integrable systems.  To date she has published over one hundred papers and articles and supervised fourteen doctoral students, three of them female.

After serving on the faculty at the Australian National University, the University of New South Wales, and the University of Adelaide, Joshi returned to the University of Sydney in 2002 as the first female full professor in the mathematical sciences.  In addition, from 2006 to 2012, Joshi served as Director of the Centre for Mathematical Biology at the University of Sydney.  In 2012, Joshi was awarded an Australian Research Council Georgina Sweet Laureate Fellowship. 

Dismayed at the number of women in senior STEM positions in Australia, in 2015 Joshi co-founded Science in Australia Gender Equity (SAGE), a program that works to promote diversity and inclusion by implementing cultural change to encourage women to attain senior STEM positions.  It has succeeded in enrolling, and requiring accountability from, almost all universities and many other research organizations in Australia.  

Joshi’s accolades include election as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (2008). She has served as the President of the Australian Mathematical Society (2008–2010).  In 2014, Joshi appeared on Australia Broadcasting Corporation’s Q&A program on Time Travel, Teaching and The Meaning of Life and in 2015, she delivered the London Mathematical Society’s 150th anniversary Hardy Lectures. In 2020, Joshi was awarded the George Szekeres Medal from the Australian Mathematical Society and in 2021 the ANZIAM (Australia and New Zealand Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Medal.

Click here for a video interview with Nalini Joshi by SAGE

Click here for a short autobiographical video by Nalini Joshi

References

Nalini Joshi – Wikipedia

Nalini Joshi – The University of Sydney

ABC – Q+A – Time Travel, Teaching and The Meaning of Life

https://austms.org.au/awards-grants/awards/the-george-szekeres-medal/

https://mathematical-research-institute.sydney.edu.au/news/nalini-joshi-2021-anziam-medal/

Kristin Lauter (b. 1969)

Kristin Lauter is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government; to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Kristin Lauter is an American cryptography researcher. Born in Wisconsin, she completed her BA, MS, and PhD (1996) in mathematics from the University of Chicago, focusing on number theory. While a Hildebrandt Research Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan, Lauter developed a class in coding theory and cryptography that piqued her interest in the practical applications of cryptography.  She started working at Microsoft Research in 1999. Her areas of research are number theory and algebraic geometry. Lauter is particularly well-known for her work on homomorphic encryption that is used in cloud security and machine learning. She is also known for her work on elliptic curve cryptography and introducing supersingular isogeny graphs as a hard problem into cryptography. Since 2008 she has been a Principal Researcher and Research Manager of the Cryptography Group at Microsoft Research.  

Through her many roles, Lauter has promoted women in mathematics.  She served as President of the AWM, 2015–2017, and was lead PI for the 5-year, $750,000 NSF AWM ADVANCE Grant to create and sustain research networks for women in all areas of mathematics.  Lauter is also Editor of Springer’s Association for Women in Mathematics Series. Lauter was a member of the International Mathematical Union’s  Committee for Women in Mathematics and served as an Executive Committee member for the Conference Board of Mathematical Sciences (CBMS) .  In addition, Lauter co-founded the Women in Numbers Network, a research collaboration community for women in number theory.

Lauter is a Fellow of  the American Mathematical Society (2015), the Association of Women in Mathematics (2017 Inaugural Class of Fellows), and the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (2020).

Click here for a video interview with Meet a Mathematician!

References

“Kristin Lauter” –Microsoft

“Kristin Lauter.” SIAM 

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/KLCurriculum-Vitae2016.pdf

Anita Tam Layton

Anita Tam Layton is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; and to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

Anita Tam Layton was born in Hong Kong. Her undergraduate degree is in computer science from Duke University in 1994. She went on to attend the University of Toronto, and earned her PhD in 2001. Her dissertation applied partial differential equations to numerical weather prediction.

Layton’s contributions to the field of computational mathematical modelling provide an abundance of applications, both inside and out of the STEM sphere. Layton’s predictive modelling has been used to understand the impacts of diabetes and hypertension on kidney function, and to solve mathematical equations surrounding combustion. After becoming a faculty member at Duke University, she earned the prestigious position of Robert R. and Katherine B. Penn Professor of Mathematics, in addition to holding appointments in the department of biomedical engineering and the department of medicine. In 2018, the Canadian government awarded Layton the Canada 150 Research Chair in Mathematical Biology and Medicine, which she currently holds at the University of Waterloo in Ontario.

Layton has been involved in the establishment and leadership of several projects and programs meant to build and strengthen mathematical and other STEM communities. For example, Layton collaborated with other colleagues at Duke University to establish a mentoring program that partners younger female math students with more senior students and sponsors student participation at mathematics conferences.

References

How Can Math Be Used to Keep us Healthy and Safe?, Good Questions, The Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University, 2018.

Anita Tam Layton, Mathematics Genealogy Project. Department of Mathematics, North Dakota State University, September 24, 2020.

Canada 150 Research Chair joins Department of Applied Mathematics, Applied Mathematics. University of Waterloo, March 29, 2018.

Canada 150 Research Chairholders, Canada 150 Research Chairs. Government of Canada, September 24, 2020.

Rachel Levy (b. 1968)

Rachel Levy is featured for her contributions to mathematics education; mathematics in business, industry, and government; and to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

After earning degrees in English and Mathematics from Oberlin College, Rachel (Ray) Levy taught middle school and high school before earning a PhD in Applied Mathematics from North Carolina State University specializing in  the mathematical modeling of thin films and biological applications of fluid mechanics.  Levy went on to become a faculty member, and then Associate Dean, at Harvey Mudd College.  

During her time at Harvey Mudd, Levy was awarded an MAA Henry L. Alder Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Beginning College or University Mathematics Faculty Member in 2013. Levy went on to serve as the Deputy Executive Director of the MAA where she created the acronym VITAL faculty to advocate for Visitors, Instructors, TAs, Adjuncts and Lecturers, and as of this writing is the 2020–2021 AMS/AAAS Congressional Policy Fellow working in the office of Senator Maggie Hassan (NH).

Levy has taken leadership roles in facilitating applied mathematics education: She served as the vice president for education for SIAM, co-authored the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Math Modeling Education (GAIMME), and created a professional development program for PK-6 teachers on incorporating math modeling into the elementary math curriculum. Levy co-founded the Business, Industry, and Government (BIG) Math Network and co-wrote the BIG Jobs Guide.  Levy also created the Grandma got STEM blog and was an editor for the MAA Teaching Tidbits and MAA Math Values blogs.  She has published pieces that promote mathematics and mathematics education in popular media such as Slate and American Scientist. She was also named a 2021 SIAM Fellow.

References

BIG Math Network, https://bigmathnetwork.org/. Accessed 30 September 2020.

GAIMME: Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Mathematical Modeling Education, Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP) and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), 2019.  

Immersion: Dive Into Math Modeling!, Immersion Math, https://mathematicalmodeling.wixsite.com/mysite. Accessed 30 September 2020. 

Levy, Rachel, “Birth of the BIG Math Network”, MAA Focus, vol. 37, no. 6, 2017, pp. 17 – 19.  

Levy, Rachel. Ray Levy, https://raylevy.org/. Accessed 30 September 2020.

Mathematical Association of America Welcomes New Deputy Executive Director,” MAA News, Mathematical Association of America, August 16, 2018, https://www.maa.org/news/mathematical-association-of-america-welcomes-new-deputy-executive-director-rachel-levy. Accessed 30 September 2020. 

Math Values, Mathematical Association of America, https://www.mathvalues.org/. Accessed 30 September 2020.

Ling Long (b. 1974)

Ling Long is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Long was born in 1974 in China. Although it was unusual then for women to pursue mathematics past the age of twelve, Long persisted in her area of interest and graduated from Tsinghua University, with a BS in mathematics in 1997. Following her undergraduate experience, she attended Pennsylvania State University and earned her PhD in 2002 in algebraic number theory. While at Penn State, Long expressed doubt that she was creative enough to pursue mathematics at such a high level, but one of her thesis advisors, Wen-Ch’ing (Winnie) Li, assured her that she had the creativity and ability needed to become a successful research mathematician. (Long’s other advisor was Noriko Yui, making her a rare mathematician to have two female advisors!)

After earning tenure and promotion at Iowa State University, Long moved to Louisiana State University where she is a full professor of mathematics. She works in modular forms, Galois representations, and hypergeometric functions. For this research, she was awarded a Young Investigators Grant from the National Security agency and at least 3 standard grants from the National Science Foundation. Long has advised at least four PhD students (at least one female), supervised postdocs, and formally mentored both new faculty and first-year mathematics graduate students.

Long was a Clay Mathematics Institute Liftoff Fellow in 2002 and awarded the AWM Ruth I. Michler Memorial Prize in 2012. She was a 2015 Research Fellow at the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM). Long is on the steering committee member of Women in Number Theory (WIN), an organization that has created a research community and mentoring network. Through WIN, she has mentored at least 7 other women mathematicians. In 2023, she was named a American Mathematical Society (AMS) Fellow for her contributions to hypergeometric arithmetic, noncongruence Modular Forms, and supercongruences. She was invited to deliver the AMS Maryam Mirzakhani Lecture at Joint Mathematics Meeting 2023.

References

Ling Long. Wikipedia. April 2020

Ling Long. Curriculum Vitae. Accessed October 2020.

Long Awarded Michler Prize. Mathematics People. Notices of AMS. May 2012.

Dawn Alisha Lott (b. 1965)

Dawn Alisha Lott is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Dawn Lott was born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and knew in the seventh grade that she wanted to major in mathematics in college. Since the age of 13, she has had to manage living with Myasthenia Gravis. Her symptoms became so severe in high school that she was not able to attend the tenth grade, but she still managed to graduate on time.

After graduating with a BS in Mathematics from Bucknell University in 1987, Lott earned a MS in Applied Mathematics from Michigan State University in 1989 and a PhD in Engineering Sciences and Applied Mathematics from Northwestern University in 1994. Her first professional position was as a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Maryland, College Park. She joined the faculty of the New Jersey Institute of Technology in 1998. In 2003 Lott moved to Delaware State University where she is a full professor of mathematics and the Director of the Honors Program. Lott was the analysis EDGE instructor in 2004.

Lott’s research is in numerical partial differential equations applied to solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, and biomechanics. Her first female graduate student received her PhD in 2010, and Lott was named the AWM/MAA Falconer Lecturer in 2011. Her lecture at MAA MathFest that year was titled “Mathematical Interventions for Aneurysm Treatment.” Lott is a former Vice President of the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM). Delaware State University awarded Lott the Faculty Excellence in Advising Award in 2013 and the Faculty Excellence in University and Community Service Award in 2014. She was a Black History Month Honoree in 2019 by Mathematically Gifted and Black. Lott was named a 2021 AWM Fellow.

References

2021 AWM Fellow Citation

Black History Month 2019 Honoree 

Black Women in Mathematics

Dawn Lott at the Mathematics Genealogy Project 

Dawn Lott Wikipedia

Dr. Dawn Lott named new director of Honors Program at DSU-Friday

DSU Announces 2014 Faculty Excellence Award Recipients

2009 DSU Honors Program Announcement

AWM Etta Zuber Falconer Lecture

The 2013 Employee Recognition Ceremony 

Guadalupe Inés Lozano/Guada Lozano (b. 1971*)

Guadalupe Inés Lozano is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Guadalupe Inés Lozano grew up in Rosario, Argentina. Lozano completed a mathematics-intensive high-school curriculum, spending a year as an exchange student in the United States. She obtained her BS in mathematics at Whitworth University in 1996. Lozano earned her PhD in 2004 in mathematics from the University of Arizona, focusing on dynamical systems. She held postdoctoral positions at the University of Michigan and the University of New Mexico.

Lozano returned to the University of Arizona in 2009 as the Executive Director of the Institute for Mathematics and Education. After a year, she left to spend three years as an adjunct instructor on quantitative methods at the Kennedy School of Government (Harvard University). She then re-joined the faculty at the University of Arizona as an associate research professor and now serves as director of the Center for University Education Scholarship (CUES) under the Office of the Provost and director of External Relations and Evaluation with the School of Mathematical Sciences. She is the co-founder of the STEM in HSI (Hispanic Serving Institutions) Working Group at the University of Arizona. She also serves on the advisory board for the Global Gender Gap in Science project.

Lozano’s research focuses on quantitative models for measuring mathematical knowledge, both at the K–12 and university levels, particularly calculus. Her investigations about how mathematics courses affect persistence of transfer students are supported by many grants. Lozano has also worked on the writing of recommendations for deploying active-learning practices in mathematics, the writing of reform calculus curricula, and assessing the impact of active-learning pedagogies on conceptual mathematics learning.

*The first print version of this card incorrectly listed Dr. Lozano’s birth year. We regret the error.

References

Cage J. How One U of AZ Math Professor Advocates for Latinx-Serving STEM Studies.  Progress Report. February 2019.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1X_xWFGk6EMlmwdLE4eLjdez2fv-F5rxl/view 

https://profiles.arizona.edu/person/guada

https://www.lathisms.org/calendar-2019/guadalupe-ines-lozano

Verdiana Grace Masanja/Verdiana Grace Kashaga (b. 1954)

Verdiana Grace Masanja is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Verdiana Grace Masanja was born on October 12, 1954, in Bukoba, Tanganyika (now Tanzania). She earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics (1976) and a masters in mathematics (1981) from the University of Dar es Salaam, and a masters in physics (1982) and PhD in mathematics (1986) from the Technical University of Berlin. She was the first woman from Tanzania to earn a doctorate in mathematics. 

Currently Masanja is a Professor of Computational Mathematics at The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology in Tanzania.  She was previously on the faculty of the University of Dar es Salaam and of the National University of Rwanda. She has supervised 5 doctorates, with more in the pipeline.

Masanja’s research is in fluid dynamics and mathematical modeling, with publications related to water pollution, food security, and disease spread.  She has published both a textbook for teacher trainees and a university number theory textbook.

Masanja served as Chair of the African Mathematical Union’s Commission for Women Mathematicians (2000–2004).  From 1995–2005, she was the Tanzania Coordinator of the Female Education in Mathematics and Science in Africa project through the Association for the Development of Education in Africa. In 2011, Masanja was awarded the UDSM Golden Outstanding Award for her contributions to the teaching and learning of mathematics in Tanzania. She has been on the editorial board for the International Journal of Applications and Applied Mathematics since 2012. Since 2015, she has worked on the Advisory Committee for the STEM and Gender Advancement Team for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In 2016 she received the Eastern Africa Universities Mathematics Programme (EAUMP) Dedicated Services Award, and in 2019, she received the Next Einstein Forum (NEF) Sage Women in STEM award.

References

“Prof. Verdiana-Grace Masanja” The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology.  

Riddle, L. H.  “Verdiana Grace Masanja”, Biographies of Women Mathematicians, Agnes Scott Colleges, Memphis, USA. 

Tawiah, A. “Prof Verdiana Masanja Tells Her Story”, Junior Graphic (23 November 2005) as found in J. J. O’Connor and E. F. Robertson, “Verdiana Grace Masanja”, MacTutor History of Mathematics, University of St Andrews. 

Prof Verdiana Grace Masanja (2020) LinkedIn profile. 

Vilma Mesa (b. 1963)

Vilma Mesa is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Vilma Mesa earned undergraduate degrees in mathematics (1986) and computer science (1987), both from the University of Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia.  From 1995 to 1996, she was an American Association of University Women International Fellow.  She completed her PhD in mathematics  education at the University of Georgia in 2000.  She was awarded an NSF CAREER grant (2008–2013). Mesa is a full professor both in the College of Education and the Department of Mathematics at the University of Michigan.  As a Fulbright Scholar, she worked at the Center of Advanced Mathematical Modeling at the University of Chile at Santiago (2016).

Mesa has over 100 publications on mathematics education and curriculum development, including books, journal articles, and book chapters.  Her scholarship examines how course materials, instructors, and students interact in order to create opportunities for student learning and to develop teaching expertise in undergraduate mathematics.  In particular, she focuses with special interest on mathematics teaching at community colleges and in inquiry-based learning classrooms. Her work offers insight into avenues of reform in mathematics instruction and promoting student retention in mathematics.

Mesa has served as PI or co-PI on multiple projects funded through the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Institute for Education Sciences (IES).   She has served as Associate Editor for Educational Studies in Mathematics, and is also an editorial board member for the International Journal for Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education, Pensamiento Numérico Avanzado, and Educación Matemática.

In 2010, Mesa received the Evan G. Pattishall and Helen Geib Pattishall Faculty Enhancement Award at the University of Michigan School of Education.

References

University of Michigan, School of Education Faculty Directory, Vilma Mesa

Lathisms-Dr. Mesa’s profile

CV_2019 

The Third Annual Reimagining Math Education Conference, Sessions by Vilma Mesa, November 2018

 

Rosa Maria Miró-Roig (b. 1960)

Rosa Maria Miró-Roig is featured for her contributions to research mathematics.

Rosa Miró-Roig was born in Manresa, Spain on August 6, 1960.  She earned her PhD in 1985 from the University of Barcelona in algebraic geometry.  A prolific research mathematician, Miró-Roig works across algebraic geometry and commutative algebra, with particular specialties including  vector fibers and moduli spaces, Hilbert schemes, Lefschetz properties, liaison theory, instanton bundles, determinantal schemes, toric varieties, and derived categories.   

She regularly collaborates with mathematicians around the world, and co-edited the volume Projective Varieties with Unexpected Properties (de Gruyter, 2004).  Miró-Roig authored the monograph Determinantal Ideals (Progress in Mathematics, 264, Birkhäuser).  For this work, she was awarded the Premi Ferran Sunyer i Balaguer, Institut d’Estudis Catalans in 2007.  This award honors an outstanding mathematical treatise of an expository nature that presents recent developments in an active area of mathematics research. Over the last 15 years, Miró-Roig has served as Principal Investigator on projects funded by at least five Spanish agencies. 

Miró-Roig is currently a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Barcelona. She has supervised 8 doctoral students, of whom 5 were women.  Miró-Roig is Editor in Chief of Collectanea Mathematica, an internationally recognized journal of the University of Barcelona and the oldest mathematics journal in Spain. 

References

https://webgrec.ub.edu/webpages/000006/ang/miro.ub.edu.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_M._Mir%C3%B3-Roig

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferran_Sunyer_i_Balaguer_Prize

Maryam Mirzakhani (1977–2017)

Maryam Mirzakhani is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Maryam Mirzakhani was born in Tehran, Iran on May 12, 1977. Mirzakhani tested into the gifted and talented middle/high school, the Tehran Farzanegan School for girls. In her junior and senior years, she competed in the International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) for Iran, earning a gold medal both times. She obtained a perfect score her senior year, one of only 8 females to do so in the history of the IMO. Also while in high school, Mirzakhani published her first paper, giving a new and elegant example of a non-4-choosable planar graph.

Mirzakhani graduated from Sharif University in Tehran in 1999 with a degree in mathematics, and earned a PhD from Harvard University in 2004. She then was a Clay Mathematics Institute research fellow. She joined the faculty at Stanford University in 2009 and was a full professor there at the time of her death. Mirzakhani’s areas of mathematical research included hyperbolic geometry, ergodic theory, symplectic geometry and Teichmüller theory. In particular, her work focused on the study of hyperbolic surfaces by means of examining their moduli spaces.

In 2014, Mirzakhani received the Fields Medal, one of the most prestigious awards given in mathematics. She was both the first woman and first Iranian to earn this award. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (2016) and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2017). The National Academy of Sciences awards the Maryam Mirzakhani Prize in Mathematics every four years in her honor.

Mirzakhani died in July 2017 from breast cancer. She was, and is, so revered in Iran that, after her death, Iranian newspapers published photographs of her with her hair uncovered. This violated a cultural taboo, in contrast to the Iranian press avoiding such photos after she won the Fields Medal. Mirzakhani’s birthday, May 12th, is known as a day for celebrating women in mathematics.

References

Maryam Mirzakhani: 1977-2017, Tributes.  November 2018 Notices of the AMS 1223

Tehran Times, Mirzakhani’s contributions both significant and enduring: Stanford President, July 17, 2017.

Cook, G. The lives they lived: Maryam Mirzakhani, NY times. December 28, 2017.

Roberts, S. Maryam Mirzakhani’s Pioneering Mathematical Legacy, The New Yorker, July 17, 2017.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1709.07540 

Florence Nightingale (1820–1910)

Florence Nightingale is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Nightingale was born in Florence, Italy on May 12, 1820, and grew up in England. Despite her parents’ attempts to dissuade her from engaging in pursuits unsuitable for genteel women, Nightingale persisted in studying mathematics and then nursing.

After her nursing apprenticeship, she worked in a hospital where she took and analyzed data on the results of various hospital and nursing protocols. During the Crimean War, Nightingale instituted the systematic recording of mortality and morbidity data at military hospitals. For years after, she campaigned for the improvement of hospital sanitation, to prevent gangrene and septicemia, based on comparative data on which she reported. She also created a uniform reporting system for hospitals to track disease and other data, and later extended this to reporting that could produce cost/benefit analyses for various surgeries. Nightingale also was a proponent of using statistics to analyze a variety of sociopolitical issues (e.g. whether compulsory education was successful), showed that colonized peoples had high mortality rates on contact with colonizers, and spent several years focusing on sanitary systems in India. She was the first to propose adding illness questions to the England Census, in 1861 (the US adopted this in 1880).

In 1858 Nightingale was the first woman to be elected to Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, because of her work in army sanitary reform during the Crimean War and contributions to military and hospital statistics. The American Statistical Association invited her to become an honorary member in 1874. In 1891 Nightingale became a Professor of Applied Statistics at Oxford University. She was the first woman to receive the Order of Merit, Britain’s highest civilian decoration, in 1907.

References

Florence Nightingale: 200 Years Since Her Birth and We Are Still Making the Same Errors With Data. April 14, 2020.

Florence Nightingale – Florence Nightingale Museum London.

Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) – Biography MacTutor History of Mathematics. Written by J J O’Connor and E F Robertson based on a project by Suzanne Davidson. October 2003.

Florence Nightingale (1820–1910) | Amstat News. September 22, 2016.

Edwin W. Kopf, Florence Nightingale as Statistician, Publications of the American Statistical Association, 1916. 

Emmy Noether (1882–1935)

 Emmy Noether, also known as Amalie Noether, is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Amalie (Emmy) Noether was born in Erlangen, Germany. She made major contributions to abstract algebra, specifically via her study of chain conditions on ideals of rings. In a landmark paper in 1921, she describes what are known today as noetherian rings, which have far-reaching relevance in commutative algebra, algebraic number theory and algebraic geometry. Noether also proved a significant theorem in theoretical physics that connects conservation principles to symmetries in nature, which physicists have compared to the Pythagorean Theorem for its impact.

As a female mathematician at a time when society did not readily accept that possibility, Noether labored unpaid for years after earning her PhD. When she started working at the University of Göttingen in 1915, she could only lecture as an “assistant” under a male colleague’s name. She did not receive a salary until 1923.

During her lifetime, Noether held positions at University of Erlangen, University of Göttingen, Moscow State University, and Bryn Mawr College, and she gave lectures at the Institute for Advanced Study. She moved to the United States after the Nazis came to power, as she was Jewish. Over her career she supervised 16 doctoral students, two of whom were women.

Noether was the first woman to give a plenary lecture at the International Congress of Mathematicians in 1932. Jointly with Emil Artin in 1932, she was the recipient of the Alfred Ackermann-Teubner Memorial Prize for the Advancement of Mathematical Knowledge. In 1980, the AWM established the Emmy Noether Lectures, and numerous other fellowships, programs, buildings, and even a crater on the moon have been named in her honor.

References

Association for Women in Mathematics, Emmy Noether Lectures, 2020.

O’Connor, J. J.; Robertson, E. F., Emmy Amalie Noether, 2014. 

Taylor, M. Emmy Noether, March 27, 2019. 

Weston, M. Celebrating Women in STEM: Dr. Emmy Noether, January, 2018. 

Lederman, L. M.; Hill, C. T. Symmetry and the Beautiful Universe, Amherst, MA: Prometheus Books, 2004.

Noether, E., Jacobson, N. (ed.). Gesammelte Abhandlungen [Collected papers] (in German), Berlin; New York: Springer-Verlag, 1983.

Helena Judith Nussenzveig Lopes (b. 1963)

Helena Judith Nussenzveig Lopes is featured for her contributions to research mathematics.

Helena Nussenzveig is a Brazilian mathematician best known for her contributions to the field of fluid dynamics. Nussenzveig was born in Brazil and earned her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 1991. A year later she returned to Brazil to work in a faculty position at the University of Campinas in São Paulo, but over the years she has also held several visiting positions in the United States. In 2012 she became a full professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. There she was head of the mathematics department from 2014 to 2016.

Nussenzveig’s research is in partial differential equations and fluid dynamics, specializing in irregular solutions of the equations for incompressible fluid dynamics, such as Euler and Navier-Stokes and derivative systems. She mainly studies 2D problems with low-regularity flows and transition to turbulence to find weak solutions to these equations. She has also worked with variational inequalities systems of conservation laws and with applications of optimal transport theory.

In 2010, Nussenzveig was awarded the National Order of Scientific Merit, an honor given to recognize scientific contributions to the cause and development of science and technology in Brazil. She chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Analysis of PDEs from 2015 to 2016 and she also was named a 2016 SIAM Fellow. Nussenzveig was an invited speaker in the PDEs Section of the 2018 International Congress of Mathematicians. In the same year she was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Sciences. In 2020, she was named a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society and was also awarded the TWAS (the World Academy of Sciences) Award for Mathematics.

References

“Helena J. Nussenzveig Lopes.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 27 June 2020.

“Helena Judith Nussenzveig Lopes.” BV FAPESP, 1 Jan. 1970

National Order of Scientific Merit.

“Prizes & Recognition.” SIAM.

http://www.abc.org.br/membro/helena-judith-nussenzveig-lopes/

Dianne P. O’Leary (b. 1951)

Dianne P. O’Leary is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics in business, industry, and government; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Dianne O’Leary was born on November 20, 1951 in Chicago, IL. She earned her BS in Mathematics with a minor in Physics from Purdue University and a PhD in Computer Science from Stanford University. Her dissertation focused on hybrid conjugate gradient algorithms.

O’Leary joined the faculty of the University of Maryland in 1978. At Maryland, she worked in the Departments of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Institutes for Advanced Computer Studies and for Physical Science and Technology. For over 35 years, she served as a consulting mathematician for the National Institute of Standards and Technology. She is currently a Distinguished University Professor, Emerita.

O’Leary’s research interests include computational linear algebra and biology, optimization, numerical solutions of ill-posed problems, image processing, information retrieval, scientific and quantum computing, and parallel numerical algorithms. She has authored two books on scientific computing and blurring images, as well as numerous journal articles and other publications, and she has presented at conferences in a variety of fields. O’Leary was editor-in-chief of the SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications (2009–2015). Her mentees have included high school, undergraduate, masters, and PhD level students. Of her 25 PhD students, five were women.

She served in the AWM Mentor Network, was a member of the SIAM/AMS/ASA/AWM/IMS/MAA/NCTM Joint Committee on Women, and chaired the AWM Committee on Committees. O’Leary was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Mathematics from the University of Waterloo in 2005. She was named both an ACM Fellow and an ACM Distinguished Scientist in 2006, the AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lecturer in 2008, and was a member of the inaugural class of SIAM Fellows in 2009.

References

The Hertz Foundation. Dianne O’Leary, PhD

O’Leary, D. Dianne Prost O’Leary

O’Leary, D. CV

Nora G. Ramirez 

Nora G. Ramirez is featured for her contributions to mathematics education and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Nora G. Ramirez is the Director of Professional Development at Arizona State University. Ramirez graduated from Texas Woman’s University with a BA in mathematics. She attended Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and earned an MS in curriculum and instruction.  

Ramirez served as a Director of the NSF-funded Parent Curriculum Materials Development for the Math and Parent Partnership with the Southwest (MAPPS) and was co-editor of 2012’s Beyond Good Teaching: Advancing Mathematics Education for ELLs.  She was a contributing author to the volumes Facilitating Conversation About Inequities in Mathematics Classrooms (2016) and Access and Equity: Promoting High-Quality Mathematics in Pre-K-Grade 2 (2017).  Ramirez actively participates in Arizona State Department of Education’s standards development and translation. 

Her distinguished leadership roles include president of TODOS: Mathematics for ALL, serving on the Board of Directors for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and president of the Arizona Association of Teachers of Mathematics. She has advised multiple NSF-funded projects.  Currently, she is active in NCTM, NCSM: Leadership in Mathematics Education, the Arizona Association of Teachers of Mathematics, and Arizona Mathematics Leaders. 

Ramirez received the 1999 Arizona Association of Teachers of Mathematics Leadership Award.  In 2014, she won the Iris M. Carl Leadership and Equity Award from TODOS for her significant contributions to increasing the quality of mathematics education to underserved students, particularly Latinx students. 

References

Lathisms 2019 Calendar

Nora G. Ramirez: n.d., NCTM

Julia Bowman Robinson (1919–1985)

Julia Bowman Robinson is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

As a child, Julia Bowman missed two years of school because of scarlet fever and rheumatic fever. After recovering, she completed four grades worth of material in a single year. She began college at San Diego State University at the age of 16, and transferred to the University of California, Berkeley. There she earned both her undergraduate degree (1940) and PhD (1948). While a graduate student, she married Raphael Robinson, a mathematics professor at Berkeley.

Robinson was prohibited from work in the Berkeley mathematics department because her husband was a professor there, so she instead taught for the statistics department. She was offered a position in the mathematics department in 1976, three years after her husband’s retirement.

Robinson’s research in computability theory and complexity theory primarily addressed decision problems, first in the context of the arithmetic of rational numbers and later in the context of Diophantine equations. She contributed to the solution of Hilbert’s Tenth Problem. Her 1949 game theory technical report for the RAND Corporation was the first publication to use the phrase “traveling salesman problem.” Robinson’s papers, which ably convey advanced mathematical thinking to non-specialists, were collected in a volume published by the American Mathematical Society in 1996.

In 1975, Robinson was the first female mathematician elected to the National Academy of Sciences. In 1982, she delivered the Noether Lecture for the AWM. She was named a 1983 MacArthur “genius” Fellow and served that year as the first female President of the American Mathematical Society. Robinson was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1985. On July 30, 1985, Robinson died of leukemia. The Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival, founded in 2007, was named in her honor.

References

Bricker, J. Julia Bowman Robinson. Biographies of Women Mathematicians.  

Feferman, S. Julia Bowman Robinson. Biographical Memoirs Volume 63. The National Academy Press (1994). 

Julia Hall Bowman Robinson- MacTutor History of Mathematics Archive. 

The Collected Works of Julia Robinson (published by AMS)

https://www.worldcat.org/title/collected-works-of-julia-robinson/oclc/804029694

Mary G. Ross (1908–2008)

Mary G. Ross is featured for her contributions to mathematics in business, industry and government; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Mary Golda Ross was born in Oklahoma in 1908, just nine months after it became a US state, and was a member of the Cherokee Nation. She earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics at Northeastern State Teachers’ College (currently Northeastern State University) in 1928, taught in rural Oklahoma schools during the Great Depression, and earned a master’s degree in mathematics from Colorado State Teachers College (currently the University of Northern Colorado) in 1938, where she also studied astronomy.

Ross had a varied professional life, including work as a statistical clerk for the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington DC, advisor to girls at Santa Fe Indian School, and engineer at Lockheed Corporation. She is best known for her engineering work. In 1942—that is, during World War II—Lockheed hired Ross to solve design problems for high-speed military planes. Unusually for the time, Lockheed retained Ross after the war, and paid for her to obtain a professional certification in engineering from University of California, Los Angeles. Over the rest of her career she worked on rockets, satellites, missiles, and designs for interplanetary space flight. After retiring, Ross gave outreach lectures to secondary school and college audiences.

Ross died in 2008 at the age of 99. To commemorate her 110th birthday, Google honored her with a Google Doodle, and she is depicted on the reverse of the 2019 US Mint Sacajawea dollar.

References

Mary G. Ross

Viola, Herman, Mary Golda Ross: She Reached for the Stars, American Indian, Magazine of Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, Winter 2018

NASA History, Mary Ross: A Hidden Figure, August 9, 2018

Google, Mary g. Ross’ 110th Birthday, August 9, 2018

Ivelisse Rubio (b. 1962)

Ivelisse Rubio is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Ivelisse Rubio was born in Puerto Rico, earning her BS and MS in Mathematics at the University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras. She then earned her PhD in Applied Math at Cornell University in 1998, and became an Assistant Professor at the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao. That same year, Rubio co-founded the REU Summer Institute in Mathematics for Undergraduates (SIMU REU), a program for Chicano, Latino, and Native American students that gives students an immersive research experience in mathematics, as well as introducing them to Chicano, Latino and Native American scientists and mathematicians. In 2006, the SIMU REU received the AMS’s first Programs that Make a Difference Award. Also in 2006, Rubio received the SACNAS Presidential Service Award for her work as co-leader of the SACNAS Mathematics Program.

Since 2007, Rubio has been a professor in the Computer Science department at the University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras. Her research interests are computational algebra, finite fields, and coding theory. She co-founded the MSRI-UP REU at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, serving as its Director until 2015. At UPR Río Piedras, Rubio is the director of the Laboratorio Emmy Noether, a research lab whose mission is to “promote diversity and access to quality education in sciences, particularly in Computational Mathematics.” Between the REU and the Laboratorio, she has mentored more than 15 undergraduate research projects. In 2010, Rubio was honored with the Infinite Possibilities Conference’s Dr. Etta Z. Falconer Award for Mentoring and Commitment to Diversity. She is currently a member of the US National Committee for Mathematics and the editorial board of the American Mathematical Monthly.

Click here for a video interview with Meet a Mathematician!

References

https://mathalliance.org/mentor/ivelisse-rubio/

https://grantome.com/grant/NSF/DMS-9907887

https://www.msri.org/people/10774

https://ymc.osu.edu/about

https://www.sacnas.org/what-we-do/honor-excellence/archive/

http://ccom.uprrp.edu/~labemmy/

Mary Ellen Rudin (1924–2013)

Mary Ellen Rudin is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities.

Mary Ellen Rudin grew up in the small and remote town of Leakey, Texas. She later attended the University of Texas, where she earned both a BA (1943) and a PhD (1949) studying under R. L. Moore. As part of this training, she did not consult published sources and so did not read a mathematics research paper until after finishing her dissertation.

Rudin’s application of set-theoretic techniques in topology enabled her to construct topological spaces that solved many long-standing conjectures. This began with her dissertation, in which she provided a counterexample to a well-known conjecture. Later, in disproving a conjecture of Dowker, she constructed what became known as a Dowker space.

Rudin held positions at Duke University and the University of Rochester before she started as a part-time lecturer at the University of Wisconsin in 1959. She was appointed full professor of mathematics at Wisconsin in 1971. In 1973 she served as an MAA Governor.

In 1974, Rudin was invited to give a lecture at the International Congress of Mathematicians. She served as the vice president of the AMS (1980–1981), and in 1981, she became the first Grace Chisholm Young Professor of Mathematics. In 1984, she was named the Noether Lecture of the AWM. In 1990, Rudin received the R.H. Bing Prize for “significant overall contributions to mathematics.” In 2012 she was named an AMS Fellow. Over her career, Rudin mentored 18 PhD students, 4 of them women. She was on the editorial board of the Notices and of Topology and its Applications. The latter published a special issue honoring Rudin’s memory in 2015. To celebrate her mentoring of topologists, Elsevier established the “Mary Ellen Rudin Young Researcher Award.”

References

Donald J. Albers and Constance Reid.  An interview with Mary Ellen Rudin, College Math. J. 19 (1988), no. 2, 114-137 

Georgia Benkart, Mirna Dzamonja, and Judith Roitman. Memories of Mary Ellen Rudin. June/July 2015 Notices of the AMS, Volume 62, Number 6

On the research of Mary Ellen Rudin.

Mary Ellen Rudin Biography

S. Watson, Mary Ellen Rudin’s early work on Suslin spaces, The Work of Mary Ellen Rudin, F. D. Tall, ed., Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 705, 1993, pp. 168–182.

Alice T. Schafer (1915–2009)

Alice T. Schafer is featured for her contributions to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Alice Turner Schafer’s journey to her 1942 University of Chicago PhD in mathematics included three years of teaching high school to earn money for graduate studies. She published papers based on her dissertation in projective differential geometry in the American Journal of Mathematics and the Duke Mathematical Journal.  

After holding positions at eight different institutions including Connecticut College, Swarthmore College, and the University of Michigan, Schafer joined the faculty at Wellesley College in 1962. She was named the Helen Day Gould Professor of Mathematics in 1969. Schafer was involved in the founding of the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) in 1971 and sited the AWM office at Wellesley. She became the second president of the AWM in 1973.  

Schafer chaired the AMS Committee on Postdoctoral Fellowships, the Committee on Human Rights, and the mathematics section of the AAAS. She also served on the CBMS Committee on Women in the Mathematical Sciences, and was Chair of the MAS-MAA-NCTM-SIAM Committee on Women in Mathematics from 1975 to 1981. Schafer led delegations to China on issues such as women research mathematicians, mathematics education, and women’s issues in mathematics and science.  After her retirement from Wellesley in 1980, she continued to chair the Affirmative Action Committee at the college for the  next several years.

Her various awards include being named a AAAS Fellow in 1985 and the 1998 Yueh-Gin Gung and Dr. Charles Y. Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics by the MAA. She was honored by the AWM in 1990 through the establishment of the Alice T. Schafer Mathematics Prize, awarded annually to an undergraduate woman for excellence in mathematics.

References

A Tribute to Alice Turner Schafer. January-February 2010 AWM Newsletter, Vol. 40, No. 1.

Blum, Lenore. A Brief History of the Association for Women in Mathematics: The Presidents’ Perspectives. September 1991 Notices of the AMS, Vol. 38, No. 7. 

Riddle, Larry. Alice Turner Schafer. Biographies of Women Mathematicians, Agnes Scott College.

Yueh-Gin Gung and Dr. Charles Y. Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics – Citation for Alice Turner Schafer

Charlotte Angas Scott (1858–1931)

Charlotte Angas Scott is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; mathematics education; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Charlotte Angas Scott was born June 8th, 1858 in Lincoln, England. In 1876, Scott entered Girton College, the first college for women in England. In 1880 she was given special permission to take the esteemed Tripos exams at Cambridge University and ranked eighth! Word that a woman had succeeded in mathematics spread and publicity put pressure on Cambridge to admit female students beginning in 1881 (though Cambridge did not award degrees to women until 1948).

In 1885 Scott received her doctorate First Class—earned at Cambridge, but awarded by University of London—and moved to Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania to serve as their first mathematics department head and only mathematician on the founding faculty of eight. Scott remained at Bryn Mawr College for forty years and was the dissertation adviser to eight women. Scott’s mathematical specialty was the study of algebraic curves of a degree higher than two. She published a textbook titled An Introductory Account of Certain Modern Ideas and Methods in Plane Analytical Geometry in 1894. It remained in print for thirty years. Scott was the first woman to join the American Mathematical Society in 1891 and also served as the Society’s first woman vice-president in 1905–06. In 1899, she became a co-editor of the American Journal of Mathematics where she served for 27 years.  She retired to Cambridge, England in 1925 where she lived until her death in 1931.

References

Scott, Charlotte Angas (1858-1931), mathematician, J. J. Gray,  Oxford University Press 2004 All rights reserved 

Kenschaft, P. C. “Charlotte Angas Scott (1858-1931)” Women of Mathematics: A Biographic Sourcebook, Grenstein, L. S. Campbell, P. J. eds. Greenwood Press Inc, Westport CT, 1987 pp. 193-203. 

Rodica Simion (1955–2000)

Rodica Simion is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Romanian-born Rodica Simion emigrated to the US in 1976 after completing her undergraduate degree at the University of Bucharest in 1974. She earned her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in 1981. Simion held positions at Southern Illinois University, Bryn Mawr College, and George Washington University. In 1999 she was named Columbian School Professor at George Washington University (GWU). 

Simion made significant contributions to algebraic combinatorics, including co-founding the still-active subfield of pattern-avoiding permutations. She also worked on problems in non-crossing partitions and shuffle posets. She contributed to the combinatorial community by co-organizing conferences, special sessions, an annual conference series, and a special year at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute.

Simion had an impact on the entire mathematical community by founding the highly impactful Summer Program for Women in Mathematics, a set of short topics courses for undergraduates that ran from 1995–2009.  She further co-organized a museum exhibit about mathematics at GWU that became an NSF- and IBM-funded exhibit at the Maryland Science Museum.  Together with a travelling version, the exhibit was visited by over four million people in five years. 

Simion’s sudden death at the age of forty-five, two weeks before a Special Session she had co-organized, was met with an outpouring of shock and sadness from colleagues. Tributes by Simion’s many collaborators and other algebraic combinatorists remember her as both a gifted mathematician and an extremely kind person.

References

Wilf H., Remembrances: Rodica Simion (1955-2000), circa. January 21, 2000

Crapanzano T., GW mourns after math professor passes away, The G.W. Hatchet, January 21, 2000

Wikipedia, Rodica Simion, September 24, 2020.

Fall 1999 Meeting at Loyola College in Maryland, The Mathematical Association of America, Maryland-District of Columbia-Virginia Section, March 5, 2012.

Official Publication of the National Honorary Mathematics Society, The IlME Journal, March 5, 2012.

Kalai G., Rodica Simion: Immigrant Complex, Gil Kalai’s blog, January 7, 2010

Sundaram S., In Memoriam: Reminiscences of Rodica Simion, ScienceDirect, May 25, 2002

Stanley, R.P. Rodica Simion January 18, 1955 – January 7, 2000, May 31, 2011

Zeilberger D., RODICA SIMION (1955-2000): An (almost) Perfect Enumerator and Human Being, January 16, 2000

https://blogs.gwu.edu/robinson/2018/03/21/twenty-fifth-anniversary-of-beyond-numbers/ 

Hortensia Soto/ Hortensia Soto-Johnson/ Tensia Soto

Hortensia Soto is featured for her contributions to mathematics education; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Hortensia Soto was born in Jalisco, Mexico and, after a year, moved with her family to a farm in western Nebraska. By the time she was in high school, Soto was the substitute mathematics teacher when needed.

Soto graduated from Chadron State College with a degree in mathematics (1988) and a masters in mathematics education (1989). She then served as the Director of the Mathematics Learning Center at the University of Southern Colorado. After this, Soto earned a masters in mathematics from University of Arizona (1994) and a PhD in educational mathematics (combining graduate mathematics with research in mathematics education) from the University of Northern Colorado (1996). Soto taught for 14 years at the University of Southern Colorado (1989–2003) before returning as a faculty member to the University of Northern Colorado. She is currently a full Professor at Colorado State University.

Her research centers on the teaching and learning of undergraduate mathematics, with an eye towards promoting equity in the classroom. Soto received an NSF grant for Mentoring and Partnerships for Women in RUME Programs. She has published over 25 articles related to assessment, outreach efforts, and the impact of technology.

Soto co-founded and directed the program Las Chicas de Mathemáticas, an outreach program for mathematically talented high school girls, many of whom are headed towards being first-generation college students. She earned the MAA Meritorious Service Award in 2012 and received an MAA Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics in 2018. Soto served as Governor of the Rocky Mountain Section of the MAA, is the current Associate Secretary of the MAA, and is an editor of the MAA Instructional Practices Guide.

Click here for a video interview with Meet a Mathematician!

Personal Statement

I was born in Belén del Refujio, Jalisco, Mexico and raised on a farm in western Nebraska. I am the second of nine children and although my parents only have a third-grade education, all my siblings have a college education.

I have published in various areas of mathematics education including assessment, mathematical preparation of elementary teachers, outreach efforts for high school girls,…..” Click here for the full statement.

References

Craviotto, C. & Soto-Johnson, H. Las Chicas’ View of Las Chicas de Matematicas.  April/May 2009 MAA Focus

Hortensia Soto.  Lathisms 2019.

Hortensia Soto Governance Bio. MAA Website

https://mathcareers.maa.org/passion-teaching-mathematics-advice-phd-math-professor-and-advocate

https://www.embodiedmathematics.com/tsoto-bio

https://www.unco.edu/nhs/mathematical-sciences/faculty/vitas/cv-soto.pdf

Bhama Srinivasan (b. 1935)

Bhama Srinivasan is featured for her contributions to research mathematics; establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Bhama Srinivasan was born in Madras, India. Mathematics became her favorite subject while attending an all-girls’ high school in Madras where she learned to write proofs in Euclidean Geometry. During her undergraduate years she considered herself fortunate to be taught abstract algebra from a text based on the lectures of Emmy Noether. In 1960, she completed her PhD at University of Manchester. Her career has mostly been at Clark University (Worcester) and the University of Illinois at Chicago. She has had five graduate students of whom two were female. Her other positions include member at the Institute for Advanced Study in 1977, and member at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in 1990.

Today Srinivasan is best known for her work in the representation theory of finite groups. In particular, she works on modular representations of finite classical groups and its connection to symmetric functions. Her contributions to the field were honored in 1979 when she presented an AMS Invited Address at the Joint Mathematics Meetings and in 1990, when she was invited to give the Noether Lecture to the Association of Women in Mathematics (AWM). Srinivasan has served terms as editor of the Proceedings of the AMS, of Communications in Algebra, and of Mathematical Surveys and Monographs, and was a member of the Editorial Boards Committee of the AMS.

Srinivasan served as President of the AWM from 1981 to 1983. During her years as President, the Association organized its first international conference, the Noether Symposium. Through the AWM, she worked to broaden the participation of women in mathematics and mathematics education. She was named Fellow of the AMS in 2012, and in 2017, she was included in the inaugural class of fellows of the AWM.

References

L Blum, A Brief History of the Association for Women in Mathematics: The Presidents’ Perspectives, Notices Amer. Math. Soc. 38 (7) (1991)                    

Notice for Bhama Srinivasan’s 1990 Noether Lecture, The Invasion of Geometry into Finite Group Theory, Association for Women in Mathematics (2005)

AWM Noether Lectures (1990)

B Srinivasan, In Her Own Words, Notices American Mathematical Society   

Bhama Srinivasan Mathshistory

 

Tatiana Toro (b. 1964)

Tatiana Toro is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Tatiana Toro was born in Colombia and participated in the 1981 International Mathematical Olympiad.  After graduating from the National University of Colombia, she earned a PhD in 1992 at Stanford University. Toro was named the Craig McKibben & Sarah Merner Professor in Mathematics at the University of Washington in 2016.  She has supervised 7 PhD students, 2 of them women. 

Toro’s research bridges geometric analysis and the calculus of variations on one side and harmonic analysis and the geometry of measures on the other. In particular, she is a leading expert in using ideas whose roots are in the calculus of variations to study the regularity of problems which do not have an underlying energy/variational structure (e.g. free boundary problems for harmonic measure). 

She was an invited speaker at the 2010 International Congress of Mathematicians and gave the NAM Clayton-Woodard Lecture at the 2016 JMM. Toro has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute. She is a board member for the College Assistant Migrant Program (CAMP) at the University of Washington, which supports first-year students from migrant and seasonal farmworker families. Toro has served on several journal editorial boards, including Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society (2009–2015), Journal of Potential Analysis (2010–2014), and Analysis and Geometry in Metric Spaces (2012–). Dr. Toro will be Director of MSRI 2022-2027. 

Her many honors and awards include Sloan (1998–2002), Guggenheim (2015–2016), and Simons (2012–2013 & 2019–2020) Fellowships. She is a fellow of the AMS (2016) and a member of the Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Exactas, Fisicas y Naturales (2020). In 2020, Toro gave the inaugural AMS Mirzakhani lecture. Also in 2020, Toro was awarded the Blackwell-Tapia prize and was elected a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

References

https://sites.math.washington.edu/~toro

https://www.samsi.info/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Toro-press-release.pdf

https://www.ams.org/journals/notices/201904/rnoti-p474.pdf​

Olga Tsuberbiller/Olga Nikolaevna Tsuberbiller/O. N. Zuberbiller/О.Н. Цубербиллер/Olga Nikolaevna Gubonina (1885–1975)

Olga Tsuberbiller is featured for her contributions to mathematics education.

Olga Tsuberbiller was born Olga Nikolaevna Gubonina in Moscow, Russia on September 7, 1885. Prior to the revolution, she married, changing her surname to Tsuberbiller.  She was widowed during the civil war that followed the 1917 Russian Revolution.

Tsuberbiller graduated in 1908 from the Bestuzhev Courses, one of the first (and most prominent) institutions of higher education for women in Russia. Soon after, Tsuberbiller began her teaching career at the Bestuzhev Courses. She also organized a mathematics library, tutored and advised undergraduate and graduate students, and worked to popularize the study of mathematics.

Tsuberbiller became a professor at Moscow State University of Fine Chemical Technology in the 1920s. In 1927, Tsuberbiller published Problems and Exercises in Analytic Geometry. This became a standard textbook in Soviet high schools, and it is still in use today in mathematics and technical schools in Russia. The book was also published more than thirty-five times in Russian and translated into Czech, Polish, German and Chinese. 

In 1923, Tsuberbiller met poet Sophia Parnok and the two lived together for over a decade.  Following Parnok’s death, Tsuberbiller met opera singer Concordia Antarova and the two were a couple until Antarova’s death in 1959.

In 1955, Tsuberbiller was named one of the Honored Scientists of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. Tsuberbiller retired in 1969 from Moscow State University. She died on September 28, 1975 and is buried in Moscow. In 2014, artist Ria Brodell painted Tsuberbiller’s portrait for the book “Butch Heroes,” a series celebrating the lives of people who did not conform to gender norms.

References

Women’s higher education institution (Bestuzhev Courses) opened in St. Petersburg. Yeltsin Presidential Library. 

Brodell, Ria. Butch Heros. MIT Press, 2018. 

Burgin, Diana L. Sophia Parnok: The life and work of Russia’s Sappho. Vol. 13 NYU Press, 1994. 

Olga Tsuberbiller, Wikipedia. 

Talitha M. Washington (b. 1974)

Talitha M. Washington is featured for her contributions to establishing, cultivating, and sustaining mathematical communities; and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Talitha Michal Washington (Talitha Michal Wangerin) was born in Frankfort, Indiana in 1974. She participated in an American Field Service youth exchange program in Costa Rica. Washington graduated Magna Cum Laude in 1996 from Spelman College with a BS in mathematics, for part of which she studied abroad at the Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara, Mexico. In 2001 Washington became the first Black American to earn a mathematics PhD from the University of Connecticut.  Her research interests include applications of differential equations in biology, structural engineering and materials engineering.

Washington was a VIGRE postdoc at Duke University.  Following academic appointments at The College of New Rochelle and the University of Evansville, Washington moved to Howard University where in 2019 she received the Outstanding Faculty Award. After a stint as a NSF Program DIrector,  she is currently a full professor of Mathematics at Clark Atlanta University and inaugural Director of the Atlanta University Center Data Science Initiative.

In addition to Washington’s applied mathematics research, she has produced scholarly publications on STEM education policy, especially on best practices on achieving racial and ethnic diversity in STEM.  In 2015, Washington was the local administrator for the EDGE program. She has served as an Advisory Board Member for NSF INCLUDES: WATCH US (Women Achieving Through Community Hubs in the United States) (2016–present).  She is a member of the College Board-MAA Joint Committee on Mutual Concerns. 

Washington is an African Scientific Institute fellow (2018) and was the MAA’s 2018 Leitzel Lecturer.   She received the 2019 Black Engineer of the Year STEM Innovator Award and the 2020 NSF Director’s Award for superior accomplishment. Washington is a fellow of the AMS (2021), the AWM (2021), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2022). She is currently serves as the President of the AWM (2022-). 

Click here for a brief video by NSF!

References

Talitha Washington (1974 – ) – Biography, MacTutor History of Mathematics

Personal website of Talitha Washington, Retrieved October 1, 2020.

Talitha M. Washington, Mathematically Gifted & Black, Retrieved October 1, 2020

Washington, T. M. (2002). Mathematical model of proteins acting as on/off switches.

Washington, T. Behind every successful woman there are a few good men, February 2018 Notices of the AMS, Vol 65, Number 2.

Sijue Wu (b. 1964)

Sijue Wu is featured for her contributions to research mathematics and to increasing the participation of women and underrepresented groups.

Sijue Wu was born in China on May 15, 1964. She earned her BS and MS at Peking University, and published her first research paper in 1985 before completing her MS. Wu earned her PhD from Yale University in 1990.

After graduation and before joining the University of Michigan in 2003, she held the following positions: Courant Instructor at New York University; assistant professor at Northwestern University; assistant, then associate professor at the University of Iowa; associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. Wu was also a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in 1992 and 1996–97. Currently, Wu is the Robert W. and Lynne H. Browne Professor in Science in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Michigan. She has supervised 6 PhD students as of this writing, two of whom are female.

Wu has been recognized for her outstanding mathematical research, which is centered on harmonic analysis and nonlinear partial differential equations from fluid dynamics. She is particularly interested in understanding singularities in surface waves. Wu is author of at least fifteen single-authored papers, as well as several treatises that reflect joint work with other scholars. Her publications have appeared in journals such as Inventiones Mathematicae, Cambridge Journal of Mathematics, and Communications in Mathematical Physics.

In 2001, she was awarded the AMS Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize for her research contributions as a female mathematician. She was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in 2002. In 2010, Wu became the first female recipient of the Morningside Gold Medal, the most prestigious award for mathematicians of Chinese descent given by the International Congress of Chinese Mathematicians. She has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for 2022.

References

Agnes Scott College, Biographies of Women Mathematicians, Sijue Wu, February 25, 2016

MacTutor History of Mathematics Archive, Sijue Wu, February 2010

Sijue Wu’s homepage, 2020

Lai-Sang Young (b. 1952)

Lai-Sang Young is featured for her contributions to research mathematics.

Lai-Sang Young was born in 1952 in Hong Kong. She earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1973, as well as a master’s in 1976 and doctorate in 1978 from the University of California at Berkeley. She is currently the Henry & Lucy Moses Professor of Science at New York University’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. She has supervised twelve PhDs, three of them by women. Young has also held visiting positions at the University of Warwick in England, the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, Universität Bielefeld in Germany, and the Institute for Advanced Study.

Young studies ergodic properties of dynamical systems, computational modeling, and theoretical neuroscience. Her research has earned her wide recognition, including the Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize in Mathematics of the American Mathematical Society (1993), the Faculty Award for Women in Science and Engineering from the National Science Foundation (1991–1996), an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship (1985–86), and a Guggenheim Fellowship (1997–98). She has given many prestigious talks, including at the International Congress of Mathematicians in both 1994 and 2018, the International Congress of Mathematical Physics in 1997, the 2005 Emmy Noether Lecture of the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), and the 2007 Sonia Kovalevsky Lecture selected by the AWM and Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics. She was also elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2004 and a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2020.

References

AMS::Browse Prizes and Awards. American Mathematical Society, Providence, RI.

Association for Women in Mathematics. Kovalevsky Lecture 2007 – Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM).

Association for Women in Mathematics. Noether Lecture 2005 – Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM). 

Lai-Sang Young – Henry & Lucy Moses Professor of Science homepage.  Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University.

MacTutor History of Mathematics. Lai-Sang Young (1952- ) – Biography – MacTutor History of Mathematics. University of St. Andrew’s, Scotland.

Mathematics Genealogy Project, North Dakota State University.  Lai-Sang Young – The Mathematics Genealogy Project. 

Disclaimer: All the biographies are unofficial and were written by volunteers using public records. If you are an honoree and notice inaccurate information in your biography, please reach out to playingcards@awm-math.org.

Don’t see your favorite woman? (a) nominate if you think she wasn’t among the 1400 we looked at or (b) maybe she’s been selected for another deck, as there were so many great women to choose or  (c) maybe she asked not to be featured (yes this did happen).

 Questions or comments? Email the playing cards project management committee at playingcards@awm-math.org.