Notable Women in Math Playing Cards

Women in Math Games

One side of each card in the EvenQuads deck features a profile of a woman mathematician who has made significant contributions to the field of mathematics. The profile side of the card can also be used to play EvenBetter, and EvenBetter Solitaire. The EvenBetter games are based on the game Orthogonal Questions invented by Dr. Jonah Ostroff.

Players: Exactly 2 or Exactly 4 or exactly 8.

Set-up: Deal 4 cards to each player.

Game play is cooperative. The players come up with yes/no questions that can be asked about the women on the cards. For example, “Is this woman alive?”  “Is this woman Latina?” “Does/did this woman do research in algebra?”

The Goal for 4 players: First decide together on two questions. Then each player chooses one card to place on the table, so that the four women shown have different answer sets to the two questions (that is, the four cards correspond to yes/no, no/yes, yes/yes, no/no).

Advanced version: First decide together on three questions, and then each player must lay two cards on the table so that the eight women shown have different answer sets to the three questions.

The Goal for 2 players: First decide together on two questions. Then each player chooses two cards to place on the table, so that the four women shown have different answer sets to the two questions (that is, the four cards correspond to yes/no, no/yes, yes/yes, no/no).

Advanced version: First decide together on three questions, and then each player must lay four cards on the table so that the eight women shown have different answer sets to the three questions.

The Goal for 8 players: First decide together on three questions. Then each player chooses one card to place on the table, so that the eight women shown have different answer sets to the three questions (that is, the eight cards correspond to yes/no/no, no/yes/no, yes/yes/no, no/no/no, yes/no/yes, no/yes/yes, yes/yes/yes, no/no/yes).

Advanced version: First decide together on four questions, and then each player must lay two cards on the table so that the sixteen women shown have different answer sets to the four questions.

If it is not possible to reach the goal, deal each player two more cards, and have each player discard two cards.

First choose two yes/no questions that can be asked about the women on the cards. (See above for examples.) Then find four women in the deck who have different answer sets to the two questions (that is, the four cards correspond to yes/no, no/yes, yes/yes, no/no).  Can you do it with three questions and eight women?  Four questions and sixteen women?